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Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

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6:02am

Wed May 2, 2012
Asia

Bin Laden's Legacy Inspires Pakistani Extremists

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 12:07 pm

Pakistanis walk past the rubble of the demolished compound of slain al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden in the northern town of Abbottabad this week. Bin Laden's legacy in Pakistan appears mixed. Support for al-Qaida seems to be down, but bin Laden is still revered by extremists.
Sajjad Qayyum AFP/Getty Images

The killing of Osama bin Laden in the Pakistani garrison town of Abbottabad one year ago Wednesday rocked the country's political and military establishment, and provoked widespread rage at what Pakistanis saw as a blatant violation of national sovereignty.

A year on, there are widely differing opinions among Pakistanis about the significance of the al-Qaida leader in a country where militant groups draw inspiration from him.

His legacy is in plain view at rallies across the country that evoke virulent anti-Americanism.

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5:37am

Wed May 2, 2012
NPR Story

Texas Battling Pollution From Poultry Production

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 11:24 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Americans are now eating more chicken than beef or pork. And meeting that demand is an industry that some have dubbed big chicken. Texas is a major player in the industry, and so now Texas must manage a problem that in other circumstances we might describe as fallout or blowback. Dave Fehling of member station KUHF in Houston explains what that problem is.

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5:37am

Wed May 2, 2012
NPR Story

Obama Accused Of Politicizing Bin Laden's Death

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 6:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Republicans have repeatedly criticized President Obama for what they contend is a weak foreign policy. Their criticism now extends to how the president talks about his signature foreign policy success.

Here's NPR national political correspondent, Mara Liasson.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: President Obama's visit to Afghanistan and his address to the nation were reminders of the responsibilities of the commander-in-chief and the attention he can muster at a moment's notice.

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5:37am

Wed May 2, 2012
NPR Story

China, U.S. Resolve Blind Activists Fate

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 6:28 am

Richard McGregor, Washington bureau chief for the Financial Times, talks to Steve Inskeep about how Chen Guangcheng may impact Thursday's talks between the U.S. and China. The blind activist left the U.S. Embassy in Beijing Wednesday, and U.S. officials escorted him to a hospital.

5:37am

Wed May 2, 2012
NPR Story

Presidential Election Protest In Egypt Turns Deadly

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 6:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Vast as they are, the interrelated problems of Afghanistan, Pakistan and al-Qaida are only some of the problems the president faces - and that will be faced by whoever wins this fall's election. Egypt is preparing for a presidential election of its own, the first since a revolution toppled President Hosni Mubarak. And today, a protest related to that election led to deadly violence.

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5:37am

Wed May 2, 2012
NPR Story

Occupy Protesters Mark May Day

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 6:48 am

The Occupy protest movement was out in force Tuesday. May 1 is traditionally a day for labor demonstrations. For the most part, the demonstrations were noisy and theatrical but restrained.

5:37am

Wed May 2, 2012
NPR Story

Task Force Evaluates Consequences Of Stand Your Ground Law

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 6:39 am

The group was convened by Florida's governor and legislative leaders. The move comes after Trayvon Martin, an unarmed teen, was shot to death by neighborhood watch captain George Zimmerman. Since the law's passage in 2005, there's been growing concern about the law among police, prosecutors and judges.

2:25am

Wed May 2, 2012
Music

Marcel Khalife: The Bob Dylan Of The Arab World

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 7:03 am

Marcel Khalife is a Middle Eastern musical and political icon.
Driss Ben Malek Courtesy of the artist

The Lebanese classical musician and composer Marcel Khalife is often compared to Bob Dylan — not for his music, but for his politics. The Middle Eastern musical and political icon sings about freedom and nationalism.

Khalife is famous for translating poetry into music. For years, he collaborated with the nationalist Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish.

"It began when I graduated from the music conservatory in Beirut. The civil war started in Lebanon — I wanted to change the world with music," says Khalife.

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2:24am

Wed May 2, 2012
Arts & Life

'Scream' Still Echoes After More Than A Century

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 6:59 am

This version of The Scream is one of four made by Edvard Munch, and the only one outside Norway. It is coming up for auction at Sotheby's in New York.
AP

It's perhaps the most reproduced piece of art ever created. It has adorned key chains and coffee mugs, and the cover of Time magazine. Andy Warhol used it, and now one of the four versions of The Scream, Edvard Munch's iconic work — the only one outside Norway — is coming up for auction at Sotheby's in New York. Sale estimates are as high as $80 million.

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2:23am

Wed May 2, 2012
Author Interviews

Do Liberals Live Under A 'Tyranny Of Cliches'?

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 6:03 am

Conservative critic Jonah Goldberg says he's inspired to write when he gets annoyed. "Aggravation is a muse," he says. And after speaking on a number of college campuses, he grew aggravated enough to write a book. It's called The Tyranny of Cliches: How Liberals Cheat in the War of Ideas.

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6:55am

Tue May 1, 2012
Europe

Netherlands Celebrates Queen Beatrix

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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6:51am

Tue May 1, 2012
Around the Nation

Calif. City Debates Location Of Stone Head

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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6:07am

Tue May 1, 2012
Africa

Conflict Simmers Between Sundan, South Sudan

South Sudan is the country that voted to break away from Sudan. They've been jostling for control of border zones, including oil fields. And just as the two sides were sitting down to negotiate, fighting broke out.

5:47am

Tue May 1, 2012
National Security

White House Official Acknowledges Drone Strikes

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The president's counterterrorism chief, John Brennan, made another statement yesterday. He argued that drone strikes to kill militants are legal.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Brennan's remarks were unusual. It's rare that the administration mentions drones at all. Yesterday, Brennan chose to say that the missile strikes by unmanned aircraft which take place in countries like Yemen and Pakistan fit within international law.

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5:47am

Tue May 1, 2012
Business

Siemens Changes Its Culture: No More Bribes

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Wal-Mart faces many questions after The New York Times reported that the company's expansion in Mexico involved systematic bribery. It is not, however, the first corporation to face this problem.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Years ago, Siemens - the giant German manufacturing firm - faced an even bigger scandal. Siemens is a little like General Electric. It seems to make everything everywhere, from security equipment to locomotives.

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