Scientists have had a literal breakthrough off the coast of Mexico.

After weeks of drilling from an offshore platform in the Gulf of Mexico, they have reached rocks left over from the day the Earth was hit by a killer asteroid.

North Korea's highest political body, the Workers' Party Congress, is convening Friday for the first time in 36 years. Over the course of the next few days, about 3,000 delegates are expected to endorse the leadership of Kim Jong Un, formalizing a rushed transition of power that followed the death of his father, Kim Jong Il.

Days after they fled a powerful wildfire, more than 80,000 people who live in and around Fort McMurray are told that "it will not be a matter of days" before they can return home. Gusting winds have helped the fires spread further, and more evacuation plans are being formed.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport is among the busiest in the country: More than 1,000 flights touch down and take off each day. More than 50 million passengers hurry through its gates each year.

But something else is happening too.

Not far from the waxed floors of the terminals and the automated voice proclaiming the end of the moving walkway, there's a school. And a classroom that has six wheels, two wings, and a tail. It is a Boeing 727, parked on the tarmac near the hangars and warehouses.

The federal government's controversial immigrant family detention camps in south Texas are back in court.

A Texas state judge has blocked a state agency from licensing the childcare facility inside a mammoth, 2,400-bed private lock-up. The detention facility was opened to temporarily confine undocumented mothers and children who have been surging across the Texas-Mexico border fleeing dangerous conditions in Central America.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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