NPR's Morning Edition

Weekdays, 4am - 9am

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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6:16am

Fri August 24, 2012
Politics

Family Research Council Stands Behind Rep. Akin

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 10:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In Tampa, where Republicans are gathering for their convention, Todd Akin has been meeting with supporters, including the Family Research Council, which, like Akin, opposes abortion rights. Connie Mackey heads the council's political action committees.

Mr. Akin, as I'm sure you know very well, as he defended his action, he said he misspoke, but then he said that he had said one word in one sentence on one day that was wrong. Is that all he got wrong?

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6:16am

Fri August 24, 2012
Europe

Norway's Mass Murder Sentenced To 21 Years

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 10:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And we are also following a guilty verdict in the case of Norwegian mass murderer Anders Breivik. A court in Oslo also declared that he is competent, not insane. And we talked about this with Alan Cowell, a correspondent for the New York Times.

So what does this mean for Breivik?

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5:47am

Fri August 24, 2012
Sports

Armstrong To Be Stripped Of Cycling Records

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 10:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And some other news on this eventful morning. Lance Armstrong says he is no longer fighting the doping case against him. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency says as a result the cyclist will be stripped of his seven titles on the Tour de France. NPR's Mike Pesca joined us to talk about it. Good morning.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

INSKEEP: How did this happen? Did Armstrong effectively admit guilt here by saying he's not fighting the charges?

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5:24am

Fri August 24, 2012
Sports

Comeback Kid: Brian Baker Rocks Tennis World

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 10:56 am

Brian Baker, 27, is a tennis player from Nashville, Tenn., who's had a Disney-like comeback season after being out of the sport for seven years with injuries. Baker started the season as 458th in the world. He's now 79th after making it to Wimbledon's fourth round. Now, Baker will be playing in his first U.S. Open since 2005.

5:21am

Fri August 24, 2012
Business

Business News

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 3:59 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a big patent ruling.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: This is a case of Apple against Samsung - and if that sounds familiar, it's because there's more than one patent case here.

While a jury in California deliberates a huge multibillion dollar patent infringement case, which we've been discussing this week, a ruling on a similar case with the same players has been issued today in South Korea.

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5:21am

Fri August 24, 2012
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 10:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: duh. That's right, D-U-H.

That's a Colombian beer, and it's at the center of a brewing legal battle between two businessmen and 20th Century Fox. The golden ale was originally called Duff Beer, and it looks just like the beer served up at Moe's Tavern on "The Simpsons." But 20th Century Fox complained that the two brothers who founded the company were infringing on a trademark here - Duff, it's from "The Simpsons." So the brothers said they changed the name to DuH.

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5:21am

Fri August 24, 2012
Around the Nation

Corrections And Comments To Stories

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 10:56 am

In a commentary this week on Morning Edition, Frank Deford said the "proof is in the pudding." A listener wrote in to say that keeping proof in a pudding would be messy. The original proverb is: The proof of the pudding is in the eating. And what it meant was that you had to try out food to know whether it was good.

2:50am

Fri August 24, 2012
Science

Web Cartoonist Raises $1 Million For Tesla Museum

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 12:12 pm

Tesla reads in front of the spiral coil of his high-frequency transformer at his lab on Houston Street in New York.
Marc Seifer Archives

The only remaining laboratory of one of the greatest American inventors may soon be purchased so that it can be turned into a museum, thanks to an Internet campaign that raised nearly a million dollars in about a week.

The lab was called Wardenclyffe, and it was built by Nikola Tesla, a wizard of electrical engineering whose power systems lit up the Chicago World's Fair in 1893 and harnessed the mighty Niagara Falls.

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2:46am

Fri August 24, 2012
Middle East

Massive Cyberattack: Act 1 Of Israeli Strike On Iran?

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 7:42 am

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (center) visits the Natanz Uranium Enrichment Facility in April 2008. Israel and the U.S. targeted the facility in 2009 with the Stuxnet cyberattack.
AP

Talk in Israel of a military strike on Iranian nuclear facilities has reached a fever pitch. Last week brought the news of an alleged "war plan" leaked to a blogger. This week, a well-informed military correspondent in Jerusalem reported that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is "determined" to attack Iran before the U.S. election.

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2:45am

Fri August 24, 2012
Planet Money

In The Kitchen With The Inventor Of Steak-Umm

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 9:08 am

Eugene Gagliardi
Joshua Marston

One night in the late 1960s, Eugene Gagliardi was lying awake in bed trying to figure out how to save his company. He was thinking about the Philly cheesesteak.

Gagliardi ran a family business that sold hamburgers and other meat to restaurant chains in the Philadelphia area. But within the span of a few months, the company had lost several of its biggest customers.

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2:23am

Fri August 24, 2012
Election 2012

Pre-Election Legal Battles Target Voting Rules

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 10:56 am

Protesters hold signs in Allentown, Pa., om July 25 as the Commonwealth Court holds hearings on voter ID laws.
Stephen Flood Express-Times /Landov

If you vote, you might very well be confused about what the rules will be when you go to cast your ballot this fall. There's been a flood of new laws on things such as voter identification and early voting, and many of them are now being challenged in court.

Some cases could drag on until Nov. 6, Election Day, and beyond. The outcomes will affect voters, and maybe even the results.

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2:21am

Fri August 24, 2012
StoryCorps

An Inmate Firefighter Finds His Proudest Moment

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 10:56 am

Daniel Ross, currently serving time in a Wyoming prison, is a member of a prison firefighting team. He told StoryCorps about the kindness of those he's helped.
StoryCorps

Severe drought has parched huge swaths of the United States this year, the first time since the mid 1950s that drought has affected so much of the nation.

With so much scorched land, the center of the country could be described as a tinderbox; in recent months, severe wildfires have raged across several states. And in at least 10 Western states, including Wyoming, many fires are fought by teams of prison inmates.

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2:18am

Fri August 24, 2012
All Tech Considered

Is The Cloud In Gamers' Future?

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 10:56 am

Nintendo's Wii U is the only new game system on the horizon as console makers are having a hard time figuring out how to improve on what they've got.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Last year, consumers spent $17 billion on video games. That sounds like a lot, but it was nearly $1.5 billion lower than the previous year. One reason: there haven't been any new game consoles out to excite buyers.

Only Nintendo's Wii U might be on shelves for the holiday season.

The console makers are having a hard time figuring out how to improve on what they've got.

Try asking a gamer like Ryan Block what would entice him to drop a few hundred bucks on a new console.

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6:22am

Thu August 23, 2012
Europe

Good Deed Ruins Prized Spanish Fresco

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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6:09am

Thu August 23, 2012
Around the Nation

Drought Assists Police With Marijuana Finds

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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