NPR's Morning Edition

Weekdays, 4am - 9am

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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2:47am

Thu October 4, 2012
Asia

Faltering Economy Threatens Pakistan's Stability

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 9:19 am

A demonstrator reacts after Pakistani policemen fire tear gas during a protest against power cuts in Karachi in June. Pakistan suffers from a massive energy crisis, one of several factors contributing to the country's severe economic troubles.
Rizwan Tabassum AFP/Getty Images

If you want to gain a good insight into Pakistan's economic situation, just look at a few of the country's newspaper headlines on any given day. The language says it all: prices soar, stocks plunge, budget deficit swells, foreign investment evaporates — and the list goes on.

Now, analysts are increasingly worried that the faltering economy could join Pakistan's pervasive insurgency and repeated political upheavals as another serious threat to the country's stability.

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2:47am

Thu October 4, 2012
Monkey See

Recreating Indiana Jones' Boulder Run In D.C.'s 'Alley Of Doom'

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 9:19 am

Janet Whitley borrows a stranger's dog to run away from a 10-foot-high plastic boulder in Washington, D.C.'s "Alley of Doom."
Chris Suspect STRATA

At a back alley in Washington, D.C., an innocent bike rider came upon a Prius driving right at him head-on. The Prius, in turn, was being chased by a 10-foot boulder.

The bike rider had accidentally stumbled into "The Alley of Doom."

For one day, anyone who showed up to this alley in the U Street neighborhood of Washington, D.C., could take a free turn at playing Indiana Jones — donning a fedora and whip and fleeing from a gigantic, rolling boulder.

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6:24am

Wed October 3, 2012
Around the Nation

High School's Dress Code Spoils Homecoming Dance

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 9:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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6:23am

Wed October 3, 2012
Food

Michelle Obama Wins Cookie Recipe Contest

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 9:14 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Michelle Obama can celebrate a win today, now that her white and dark chocolate-chip cookies beat out Ann Romney's M&M cookies in Family Circle Magazine's Presidential Bake-Off. During the 2008 election, Cindy McCain's oatmeal butterscotch cookies won. Michelle Obama may be savoring her victory all the more, since on this, the couple's 20th anniversary, she's had to trade date night for debate night. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

5:14am

Wed October 3, 2012
Planet Money

Why New York Is A Hub In The Global Trinket Trade

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 10:07 am

Lam Thuy Vo NPR

For more on the junk economy, see this slideshow.

There's a neighborhood in New York City that has always been a mystery to us. Smack dab in the middle of Manhattan, around 29th street, is the wholesale district. There you can find rows of narrow storefronts packed to the ceiling with trinkets. Racks and racks of fake gold chains. Acres of souvenir lighters and walls of belt buckles. Plastic, plastic, plastic toys.

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5:13am

Wed October 3, 2012
It's All Politics

On Eve Of First Debate, NPR Poll Shows Romney Within Striking Distance

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 12:38 pm

Early voting has begun in the battleground states of Ohio, Virginia and Iowa. Voting booths were set up for early voting Thursday at the Black Hawk County Courthouse in Waterloo, Iowa. Ahead of Wednesday's first presidential debate, an NPR poll finds President Obama with a 7-point lead nationally, but his GOP challenger, Mitt Romney, is within striking distance.
Scott Olson Getty Images

The latest poll by NPR and its bipartisan polling team [pdf] shows President Obama with a 7-point lead among likely voters nationally and a nearly identical lead of 6 points in the dozen battleground states where both campaigns are spending most of their time and money.

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3:20am

Wed October 3, 2012
History

Wikipedia Politicizes Landmark Historical Event

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 9:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

When President Obama and Mitt Romney debate tonight, many people will ask if their claims are true. Each one has already been asking that about the other side.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: They will try to distract you and sometimes - how do I put this nicely? They will just fib.

MITT ROMNEY: The president tends to - how shall I say it? - say things that aren't true.

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3:20am

Wed October 3, 2012
Business

Homeowners Facing Foreclosure Get New Protections

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 9:14 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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3:20am

Wed October 3, 2012
Business

Business News

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 9:14 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with good news for automakers.

U.S. auto sales last month were the best they've been in four and a half years. That's according to numbers compiled by the research firm Auto Data. Experts give credit the boost in sales to cheap financing for car loans and growing consumer confidence. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

3:20am

Wed October 3, 2012
Around the Nation

Early Voting Gets Underway In Ohio

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 9:14 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Early voting began in Ohio yesterday. More than a million people have signed up for mail-in ballots, and thousands more began voting in person. From member station WKSU, M.L. Schultze reports.

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2:37am

Wed October 3, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Medicare Dings Hospitals For Too Many Repeat Customers

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 9:14 am

Denver Health has a network of clinics to keep track of patients discharged from its hospital.
Denver Health

A paradox of American health care is that hospitals are sometimes rewarded for doing things badly.

Patients who are discharged, for example, shouldn't have to come right back because they got worse after getting home. But if they do come back, hospitals benefit because they can fill an empty bed and bill for more care.

The federal government says, in fact, that Medicare alone pays $17.4 billion a year for unnecessary return visits.

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2:35am

Wed October 3, 2012
All Tech Considered

Calif. Greenlights Self-Driving Cars, But Legal Kinks Linger

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 4:56 pm

California Gov. Jerry Brown (front left) rides in a driverless car to a bill signing at Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., on Sept. 25.
Eric Risberg AP

Google's self-driving robotic cars have been on the roads in California for two years, but they have been operating in a legal limbo. These cars were not explicitly forbidden, but laws governing self-driving vehicles didn't exist.

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2:34am

Wed October 3, 2012
James Bond At 50

The Sound Of James Bond: Vic Flick's Surf Guitar

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 12:36 pm

The 007 theme is one of the most famous themes in movie history. The infamous guitar riff that gives the theme its secret agent feel was performed by Vic Flick, who spoke to Morning Edition about the day he played it, 50 years ago.

In 1962, Flick was a 25-year-old studio guitarist who was asked to help give the James Bond theme more of a punch. Composer Monty Norman, who wrote the theme, was scrambling to complete the score for the first Bond movie, Dr. No. He'd scratched out a rough draft of the theme, but Flick says it fell a little flat.

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2:25am

Wed October 3, 2012
The Salt

In Washington State, Picker Shortage Threatens Apple Boom

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 4:57 pm

Amilia Magno, 23, of Pasco, Wash., carries a heavy load of buckeye gala apples in Broetje Orchards near Prescott, Wash.
Anna King Northwest News Network

In western Michigan, there aren't enough apples to pick because bad weather decimated 85 to 90 percent of the crop. But Washington state has the opposite problem — there's an abundance of apples, but not enough pickers.

This should be the happiest, busiest time of year in Washington apple orchards. But now — just as the peak of apple harvest is coming on — Broetje Orchards manager Roger Bairstow is wincing.

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9:03pm

Tue October 2, 2012
Sweetness And Light

The NFL's Lesson: There's No Replacing Good Refs

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 9:14 am

Referee Walt Anderson makes a call in the Chicago Bears game against the Dallas Cowboys Monday, ending the NFL's first full slate of games with its regular officials.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images

So, we found out that the National Football League is too big to fail. But not so big that it couldn't make a complete fool of itself and show to the world that its owners are stingy, greedy nincompoops.

Not so big that it couldn't make its commissioner, Roger Goodell, stand out in front, looking lost and small, so that their erstwhile tough-guy commander suddenly became an errand boy, losing respect and dignity that will be hard to regain the next time he needs it.

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