All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-6pm, Saturdays 4-5pm, Sundays 5-6pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert SiegelMichele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATCexpanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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2:16pm

Tue May 14, 2013
Music Reviews

Aesop Rock And Kimya Dawson Showcase Their Strengths

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 8:16 pm

The Uncluded features Aesop Rock and Kimya Dawson.
Chrissy Piper Courtesy of the artist

7:27pm

Mon May 13, 2013
Media

U.S. Obtained AP Journalists' Phone Records

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 4:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Today we learned of some news from the Associated Press in which the AP is at the center of the story. The newswire service reports that the Justice Department secretly obtained two months of editors and reporters' phone records from last year as part of a government investigation. Late today, the Justice Department issued a statement saying it strives to strike a balance between the need for information in criminal cases and the rights of individuals and news organizations.

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5:34pm

Mon May 13, 2013
Law

Supreme Court Sides With Monsanto In Seed Patent Case

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 10:59 am

A farmer holds Monsanto's "Roundup Ready" soybean seeds at his family farm in Bunceton, Mo.
Dan Gill AP

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously Monday that when farmers use patented seed for more than one planting in violation of their licensing agreements, they are liable for damages.

Billed as David vs. Goliath, the case pitted an Indiana farmer against the agribusiness behemoth Monsanto.

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4:47pm

Mon May 13, 2013
All Tech Considered

ABC's Live Streaming Aimed At Keeping Cable Cords Intact

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 4:42 pm

A new iPad app lets viewers watch live ABC programming starting Tuesday in New York and Philadelphia.
ABC

There's another way television is moving online. Starting Tuesday, ABC will let viewers in New York and Philadelphia watch their local stations over the Internet. But this is not a way to cut your cable bill.

NPR's Dan Bobkoff discusses the change with All Things Considered co-host Audie Cornish.


Interview Highlights

On what's new here

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4:15pm

Mon May 13, 2013
Parallels

As Stigma Eases, Single Motherhood In Mexico Is On The Rise

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 6:25 pm

Maria Carlotta Santa Maria is a single mother in Mexico and is the sole wage earner in her household. Women like her are becoming more common there, and the stigma once associated with having children out of wedlock is fading.
Carrie Kahn NPR

On her daily route delivering laundry in her working-class neighborhood in southern Mexico City, Maria Carlotta Santa Maria, or Mari, as she is known, seems to know everyone: the mailman, the woman on the corner selling salty nuts, and her favorite greetings are for the guys at the corner gas station.

Mari is the kind of person that can make this inhospitable and overwhelming megacity seem almost small and friendly. But as a single mother, she says raising her 10-year-old daughter Jimena alone hasn't been easy.

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4:11pm

Mon May 13, 2013
Media

Bloomberg News Apologizes For Tracking Subscribers

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 4:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The editor-in-chief of Bloomberg News is apologizing. That's after admitting his reporters tracked how subscribers use the company's famous financial data terminals. The disclosure has caused an uproar in the financial services world. As NPR's David Folkenflik reports, the episode has roots both in Bloomberg's innovations in data management, and its corporate culture.

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4:05pm

Mon May 13, 2013
Social Entrepreneurs: Taking On World Problems

An 'Entrepreneurial Seedling' Sprouts In Detroit

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 4:42 pm

A worker with The Empowerment Plan creates a coat that will later be donated to a homeless person. The organization works inside Ponyride, a 30,000-square-foot warehouse near downtown Detroit. The warehouse hosts other local businesses, too.
Courtesy of Order & Other

Detroit is littered with empty warehouses — more than 7,000, by one estimate. They've become skeletons of the city's industrial past.

But not this warehouse, where Jennifer Blake is feeding quilted fabric through a sewing machine. She's making a coat. Fashioned with Velcro fastenings, it has a sleeping bag that slips out on the bottom, and is made of recycled car parts, she says.

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4:05pm

Mon May 13, 2013
The Record

When The Right One Comes Along: How 'Nashville' Tells Stories In Song

Originally published on Sun May 19, 2013 8:28 am

Characters Scarlett O'Connor and Gunnar Scott are young, unknown artists in Nashville, just like the songwriters behind their song, "When the Right One Comes Along."
Katherine Bomboy-Thornton ABC

With Nashville's first season about to wrap up — and a second one just ordered — the prime-time TV drama has found a niche audience on Wednesdays. The soundtrack has also enjoyed pop chart success.

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3:24pm

Mon May 13, 2013
NPR Story

White House On Defense Over IRS Audits, Benghazi

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 4:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish. The Obama administration is playing defense on multiple fronts. One topic, the IRS; officials there have admitted they targeted conservative groups that were applying for tax-exempt status. The other issue is Benghazi. Republicans are once again hammering the White House for editing talking points about last September's deadly attack in Libya.

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3:24pm

Mon May 13, 2013
NPR Story

Creator Of Popular Schwinn 'Sting-Ray' Bike Dies

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 4:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Finally, this hour, we remember the man behind a famous bicycle design. Now, if you spent your childhood riding a bike with big handlebars and a banana seat, then you owe Al Fritz your thanks. The former executive for the bike company Schwinn died last week. In 1963, Fritz introduced the model known as the Sting-Ray, and it got a boost with ads on the TV show "Captain Kangaroo."

(SOUNDBITE OF TV COMMERCIAL)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER #1: Captain will be back after these messages.

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2:14pm

Mon May 13, 2013
All Tech Considered

Facebook Users Question $20 Million Settlement Over Ads

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 4:42 pm

Dado Ruvic Reuters/Landov

A San Francisco judge will decide this month whether to approve a settlement in a class-action lawsuit that could affect more than 70 million Facebook users. The $20 million deal would mark the end of a years-long battle over the social network's "Sponsored Stories" advertising.

But Facebook users' images could still appear in ads if they don't change their settings. And many users say the deal before the judge doesn't go far enough to protect their privacy.

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2:05pm

Mon May 13, 2013
Parallels

Vietnam's Appetite For Rhino Horn Drives Poaching In Africa

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 4:42 pm

A Vietnamese rhino horn user displays her horn, which was a gift from her well-to-do sister. Last year, rhino horn sold for up to $1,400 an ounce in Vietnam, about the price of gold these days.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Africa is facing a growing epidemic: the slaughter of rhinos.

So far this year, South Africa has lost more than 290 rhinos — an average of at least two a day. That puts the country on track to set yet another record after poachers killed 668 rhinos in 2012.

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2:05pm

Mon May 13, 2013
Parallels

Five Years After A Quake, Chinese Cite Shoddy Reconstruction

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 4:42 pm

The wife of Li Yiqian, Yang Liming, sits in their house, which is plastered with pictures of China's leaders, an attempt to help prevent local authorities from demolishing it. Her husband has been sentenced to three years in prison for organizing a crowd to create a disturbance; she believes it's for his work in helping dispossessed villagers petition.
Louisa Lim NPR

Five years after the massive Wenchuan quake in China's Sichuan province left about 90,000 dead and missing, allegations are surfacing that corruption and official wrongdoing have plagued the five-year-long quake reconstruction effort.

The official press is full of praise for how "all Chinese have a reason to be proud of what the concerted efforts of the entire nation achieved in creating a new life for the survivors."

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5:00pm

Sun May 12, 2013
Code Switch

Checking More Than One Box: A Growing Multiracial Nation

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 7:35 pm

Thien-Kim Lam (left) and Larry Bright (right) with their 3-year-old son and 7-year-old daughter, are a multiracial family. They represent a growing segment of American families that are inter-racial and whose children identify as both races.
Courtesy of Thien-Kim Lam

Larry Bright holds his 3-year-old son's hand while the boy steps through a leafy playground in Silver Spring, Md., and practices counting his numbers in English.

At the top of the slide, the boy begins counting in his other language: Vietnamese.

Bright, the boy's father, is African-American; his mother, Thien Kim Lam, is Vietnamese. The couple has two children.

"They are a perfect mix between the two of us," Lam tells Arun Rath, host of weekends on All Things Considered.

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2:49pm

Sun May 12, 2013
Music Interviews

Balancing Influences: Saxophonist Mahanthappa Blends Styles

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 5:52 pm

Rudresh Mahanthappa's latest album is Gamak.
Jimmy Katz Courtesy of the artist

When a single review compares an artist's work to both Mahavishnu Orchestra and The Stooges, hardcore rock music fans sit up and take notice.

That's the high praise the Los Angeles Times bestowed upon saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa.

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