Liz Halloran

Liz Halloran joined NPR in December 2008 as Washington correspondent for Digital News, taking her print journalism career into the online news world.

Halloran came to NPR from US News & World Report, where she followed politics and the 2008 presidential election. Before the political follies, Halloran covered the Supreme Court during its historic transition — from Chief Justice William Rehnquist's death, to the John Roberts and Samuel Alito confirmation battles. She also tracked the media and wrote special reports on topics ranging from the death penalty and illegal immigration, to abortion rights and the aftermath of the Amish schoolgirl murders.

Before joining the magazine, Halloran was a senior reporter in the Hartford Courant's Washington bureau. She followed Sen. Joe Lieberman on his ground-breaking vice presidential run in 2000, as the first Jewish American on a national ticket, wrote about the media and the environment and covered post-9/11 Washington. Previously, Halloran, a Minnesota native, worked for The Courant in Hartford. There, she was a member of Pulitzer Prize-winning team for spot news in 1999, and was honored by the New England Associated Press for her stories on the Kosovo refugee crisis.

She also worked for the Republican-American newspaper in Waterbury, Conn., and as a cub reporter and paper delivery girl for her hometown weekly, the Jackson County Pilot.

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4:17pm

Wed December 12, 2012
It's All Politics

In Midwest Union Fights, Michigan Shows 2010 Election Still Trumps 2012

Originally published on Wed December 26, 2012 11:54 am

Silent protesters Wednesday in Lansing, Mich., wear tape with messages that signify wages they say they could lose because of the state's new right-to-work law.
Paul Sancya AP

No one can argue the setback to organized labor served up by Michigan's new law, which bars unions from requiring workers to pay dues even if they don't join their workplace bargaining unit.

Tuesday's passage of "right to work" legislation in a state dominated by the auto industry and the historically powerful United Auto Workers was a surprising "smack in the face" to unions, says labor expert Lee Adler, especially given President Obama's nearly 10-point win in the state last month.

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2:53am

Sun December 9, 2012
It's All Politics

Add This Group To Obama's Winning Coalition: 'Religiously Unaffiliated'

President Obama walks with his daughters Sasha, foreground, and Malia as they leave St. John's Episcopal Church in Washington, on Oct. 28. An analysis of exit polls shows that those who claim no specific religious affiliation were a key Obama voting bloc in the presidential race.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

The big demographic story out of the 2012 presidential election may have been President Obama's domination of the Hispanic vote, and rightfully so.

But as we close the book on the election, it bears noting that another less obvious bloc of key swing state voters helped the president win a second term.

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1:42pm

Fri December 7, 2012
It's All Politics

Who's Behind The Fiscal Cliff Lobbying Effort?

As the White House and Congress continue to wrangle over a deal to avoid the "fiscal cliff" and its billions in automatic spending cuts and tax increases, we wanted to take a look at who is spending big to influence the debate behind the scenes.

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2:10pm

Tue December 4, 2012
It's All Politics

Obama And Boehner Call It Negotiation; The Rest Of Us Are Permitted To Laugh

Originally published on Sat December 8, 2012 12:29 pm

President Obama and House Speaker John Boehner meet in the White House on July 23, 2011. At that time, they were discussing how to avert a debt default. The talks ultimately led to the deal that now brings us aspects of the so-called fiscal cliff.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

If you're tempted to throw back your head and guffaw when you hear the word "negotiation" linked with "Congress" and "fiscal cliff," please, don't hesitate.

Because what you're seeing play out publicly between congressional Republicans and Democrats and the White House bears little resemblance to negotiation.

"The game that's being played is the same game that's been played over the past few years — brinksmanship, and hard positional bargaining," says William Ury, who knows negotiation when he sees it.

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2:13pm

Wed November 28, 2012
It's All Politics

Roughing Up Rice: GOP Senators Play The Personal And Political

Originally published on Wed November 28, 2012 4:30 pm

U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice leaves a meeting with Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, on Capitol Hill on Wednesday.
Evan Vucci AP

The GOP's roughing up of U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice, thought to be President Obama's top pick for his second-term secretary of state, brings to mind the last time the Senate rejected a commander in chief's choice for that most crucial position.

It was some six decades ago, and after bitter and tumultuous hearings — think allegations of communism and homosexuality, as well as a high-profile suicide — that senators dumped the president's nominee by a vote of 74-24.

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4:25pm

Mon November 26, 2012
It's All Politics

GOP Pushback On No-Tax Norquist: Less Than Meets The Eye

Originally published on Tue November 27, 2012 9:00 am

Grover Norquist, head of Americans for Tax Reform, speaks on Nov. 5, 2011, in Washington, D.C.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

A handful of congressional Republicans after finishing their Thanksgiving dinners decided to give anti-tax crusader Grover Norquist the brushoff, saying they wouldn't abide by his "no new taxes" pledge as they work on a budget deal.

Breathless coverage ensued.

"Move over, Grover?" read one headline.

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4:02pm

Fri November 16, 2012
It's All Politics

Florida Judge Denies Call For Recount, But Allen West Continues Quest

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 5:56 pm

Rep. Allen West, R-Fla., has refused to concede defeat in his House race.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

A Florida judge on Friday denied Republican Rep. Allen West's last-ditch bid for a recount of early-voting ballots in the close and ugly re-election race he is losing to Democrat Patrick Murphy.

West's effort to wrest the race from Murphy, who is leading in a race that has yet to be officially called, now goes to the St. Lucie County elections board, which was scheduled to review his complaint late Friday.

It was unclear when it would rule.

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4:22pm

Thu November 15, 2012
It's All Politics

As Dust Settles, Voters Cite Campaign's Negativity

Lynn Armstrong Coffin and Eric Papalini box with puppets depicting Mitt Romney and President Obama in Sarasota, Fla., in September.
Chris O'Meara AP

Voters were frustrated by a 2012 presidential race they called more negative than usual and more devoid of substantive discussion of issues, according to a survey released Thursday by the Pew Research Center.

And voters are pessimistic about the prospect of a more productive Congress, Pew found.

Two-thirds of registered voters surveyed after Election Day said they believe relations between Democrats and Republicans will stay the same or worsen over the coming year.

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10:03am

Thu November 15, 2012
It's All Politics

Meet The New GOP, Same As The Old GOP?

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 3:16 pm

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus rides the Mitt Romney campaign bus days before the presidential election. Despite Romney's loss and other GOP failures, Priebus, who helped the party raise huge sums of money in 2012, may seek a second term.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

There has been no dearth of post-election Republican self-flagellation.

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, on the eve of heading out to a meeting of Republican governors in Las Vegas, warned the GOP to "stop being the stupid party." At the gathering Wednesday night, he leveled more harsh criticism at party presidential candidate Mitt Romney.

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5:23pm

Sat November 10, 2012
It's All Politics

Republicans Scramble To Repair Breech With Hispanics

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 10:16 am

Paging Jeb Bush.

Your party needs you.

In the aftermath of Tuesday's election losses, Republicans have been scrambling to formulate a fix for what went wrong.

A big part of that calculation involves repairing relations with Hispanics, the fast-growing electoral power base that rejected Republican Mitt Romney's "self deportation" immigration solution and voted for President Obama in numbers that exceeded 70 percent.

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4:33pm

Wed November 7, 2012
It's All Politics

Did SuperPAC Money Hurt Romney More Than It Helped?

Originally published on Wed November 7, 2012 4:46 pm

Casino magnate Sheldon Adelson at the presidential debate between Mitt Romney and President Obama, in Denver on Oct. 3. Adelson invested millions in an effort to help elect Romney — but only after bankrolling a superPAC for former House Speaker Newt Gingrich in his anti-Romney Republican primary battle.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Republican strategist Karl Rove's on-air refusal to accept his own network's election night call putting Ohio in President Obama's win column dominated the blogosphere Wednesday.

And, why not? Rove's Crossroads political money empire had showered Republican candidates with close to $300 million this election cycle, a funding gusher courtesy of the 2010 Supreme Court's Citizens United decision and other recent court decisions.

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3:27am

Wed November 7, 2012
It's All Politics

Gubernatorial Battles: Republican Takes N.C., Democrat Wins N.H.

New Hampshire Gov.-elect Maggie Hassan speaks to supporters Tuesday in Manchester, N.H., after defeating Republican Ovide Lamontagne to keep the governor's seat in Democratic control.
Jim Cole AP

Voters in North Carolina put a Republican in their governor's office for the first time in two decades, and New Hampshire elected a new female Democratic governor.

But the closely watched tossup races in Montana and Washington, where Democrats currently serve as governors, remained too close to call late Tuesday.

Eight of the gubernatorial seats up for grabs are now held by Democrats; three are in Republican hands. Republicans currently hold 29 governorships, Democrats have 20, and Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee is an independent.

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5:58am

Tue November 6, 2012
It's All Politics

GOP Eyes Gains As Voters In 11 States Pick Governors

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 8:03 pm

New Hampshire gubernatorial candidates Democrat Maggie Hassan and Republican Ovide Lamontagne talk before their Oct. 4 debate in Henniker, N.H.
Jim Cole AP

Voters in 11 states will pick their governors tonight, and Republicans appear on track to increase their numbers by at least one, with the potential to extend their hold to more than two-thirds of the nation's top state offices.

Eight of the gubernatorial seats up for grabs are now held by Democrats; three are in Republican hands. Republicans currently hold 29 governorships, Democrats have 20, and Rhode Island's Gov. Lincoln Chafee is an Independent.

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11:49am

Sun November 4, 2012
It's All Politics

Potential Election Day Firsts: Races To Watch

Originally published on Sun November 4, 2012 11:59 am

On Tuesday, Mia Love could become the first black Republican woman elected to Congress. Here, she speaks at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., on Aug. 28.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Election Day is promising many firsts — and not just the obvious ones.

Yes, the country could get its first Mormon president if Republican Mitt Romney is elected. And of course, it could get its first two-term African-American commander in chief if President Obama is re-elected.

But Tuesday offers a smorgasbord of other potential "first" opportunities across the nation — from New Hampshire, which could end up with the nation's first all-female congressional delegation, to Arizona, which could elect its first Hispanic U.S. senator.

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3:00pm

Thu November 1, 2012
It's All Politics

What Romney's Run Means For Mormonism

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 9:59 pm

The Mormon Salt Lake temple in Salt Lake City.
George Frey Getty Images

Win or lose on Election Day, Republican Mitt Romney has already made history as the first Mormon to win a major party presidential nomination.

But has his race for the White House changed Americans' perceptions and stereotypes of the small, insular but fast-growing religion, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints?

And, by extension, has Romney affected how Mormons view their place in the nation?

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