2:19pm

Thu February 9, 2012
The Two-Way

Steve Jobs' FBI File Reveals People Who Knew Him Had A Mixed Opinion Of Him

Steve Jobs.
Jeff Chiu AP

The FBI has released the files it kept on Steve Jobs, the co-founder of Apple. The 191-pages are part of a background search the FBI undertook in order to clear him for an appointment made to the President's Export Council by George W. Bush in 1991.

For the background check, the FBI conducted 30 interviews with friends, family, neighbors and former colleagues. What emerged was a portrait of a man admired for his brilliance but whose personal life and character are often questioned. It's not unlike the picture painted in Walter Isaacson's 2011 biography "Steve Jobs."

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2:15pm

Thu February 9, 2012
The Two-Way

Escaped 'Rhino' Successfully Captured In Tokyo

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 2:40 pm

Netting the escapee.
BBC News

In 2010, it was a guy dressed up in a tiger suit that wouldn't have scared many toddlers. One year keepers successfully captured a "zebra."

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1:05pm

Thu February 9, 2012
The Two-Way

Call It 'Gulf Of America,' Not Gulf Of Mexico, Lawmaker Says In Bit Of Satire

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 5:26 pm

Sept. 2005: Hurricane Rita enters the Gulf of Mexico — or Gulf of America, as Mississippi House Rep. Stephen Holland would say.
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

Update at 3:25 p.m. ET. It's Satirical, The Lawmaker Says:

Daniel Cherry of Mississippi Public Broadcasting just talked with Rep. Stephen Holland — the Democratic lawmaker who's getting a lot of attention for introducing a bill to rename the Gulf of Mexico to Gulf of America.

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1:02pm

Thu February 9, 2012
The Two-Way

Fun, Fun, Fun 'Til Council Takes The Frisbee Away

A surfer watches the waves just before sunset at Will Rogers State Beach in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles.
Reed Saxon AP

Throwing a frisbee or a football on a Los Angeles County beach in the summer could cost you $1,000.

As NPR member station KPCC reports, the L.A. Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved a revision of a 37-page ordinance that outlines acceptable behavior on county beaches.

KPCC reports:

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12:58pm

Thu February 9, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Feds Find Wide Variation In Serious Infections Linked To Catheters

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 6:09 pm

Inattention to catheters used often in ICUs can lead to serious infections.
iStockphoto.com

Across the country, 1 in 6 hospitals has high rates of one of the most serious kinds of preventable infections — those caused by catheters inserted into large veins, according to new data published by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

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12:09pm

Thu February 9, 2012
The Two-Way

U.S. Regulators Approve First Nuclear Power Plant In A Generation

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 12:33 pm

The containment vessel of Vogtle Unit 3 is already being assembled.
Southern Company

The National Regulatory Agency announced it had given Southern Co. the OK to build two nuclear reactors in Georgia, making it the first new nuclear power plant approved in a generation.

The AP, which reported earlier today that the NRC was poised to give its approval, reports that one of the $14 billion reactors could be ready as soon as 2016. The second reactor could begin operating in 2017. The AP adds:

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11:35am

Thu February 9, 2012
The Two-Way

Ban On Insider Trading By Lawmakers Passes House, Heads To Obama's Desk

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 11:39 am

By a nearly unanimous vote this morning the House passed the STOCK Act, which as NPR's Tamara Keith has reported, "would, among other things, explicitly ban insider trading for members of Congress and their staffs."

The vote was 417-2, with 14 members absent. The two nay votes were from Rep. John Campbell, R-Calif., and Rep. Rob Woodall, R-Ga.

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11:24am

Thu February 9, 2012
Anti-Government Protests Roil Egypt

Wael Ghonim: Creating A 'Revolution 2.0' In Egypt

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 12:32 pm

One year ago, Wael Ghonim spoke with reporters in Cairo's Tahrir Square, as protests there continued.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

The protests that led to the Egyptian revolution last year were organized in part by an anonymous Facebook page administrator. When the police found out who he was, they arrested and interrogated him. After his release, Wael Ghonim became the public face of the Egyptian revolution.

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11:21am

Thu February 9, 2012
The Two-Way

Gorbachev: Russia's Putin Has 'Exhausted' Himself

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 11:25 am

Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev delivers a lecture entitled "My Life in Politics" at the International University in Moscow on Thursday.
Alexander Zemlianichenko AP

The former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev says if things don't change in Russia after it holds presidential elections, there will be more protests.

In a lecture at Moscow's International University on Thursday, Gorbachev also had some harsh words for Prime Minister Vladimir Putin.

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11:00am

Thu February 9, 2012
Election 2012

Conservatives Hope To Reach Hard-Pressed Youth

Young conservatives are bringing new energy to this year's Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) with a panel called, "Why Am I Living in My Parent's Basement?" Host Michel Martin talks with two young people attending, about how they hope to bring under-30 voters to their side of the aisle.

11:00am

Thu February 9, 2012
World

'We Are Still Awake,' Says Egyptian Protester

It's been nearly one year since Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak stepped down, and the country is still experiencing the growing pains of transition. Last year, host Michel Martin spoke with a young protester minutes after Mubarak's resignation. Now, Martin catches up with her again to see if she's still optimistic about changes in her country.

10:55am

Thu February 9, 2012
It's All Politics

House Passes Bill That Would Ban Insider Trading By Lawmakers

The House on Thursday passed a bill that would ban congressional insider trading. The STOCK Act passed overwhelmingly, 417-2, despite some partisan disagreements over its scope.

With congressional approval at all-time lows, the bill was widely seen by lawmakers as a small step in restoring public confidence. But differences remain to be worked out with a Senate measure, passed last week, before a bill could be sent to President Obama.

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10:29am

Thu February 9, 2012
It's All Politics

Another Senate Campaign Could See SuperPAC Truce (Or Not)

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 10:48 am

It might seem like the equivalent of trying to bail the ocean with a bucket but we now have another major race, the U.S. Senate race in Montana, in which the idea of a self-imposed truce by the candidates on superPAC money in the race has come up.

Sen. Jon Tester, a Democrat, sent a letter to Rep. Denny Rehberg, the Republican who seeks to unseat him, requesting a truce on outside money funding negative ads for their campaigns, meaning superPACs.

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10:20am

Thu February 9, 2012
The Salt

Trans Fats Are Leaving The Food Supply And The Body, Study Finds

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 10:22 am

A vending cart with breakfast foods in New York City. In 2008, the city expanded its trans-fat ban from spreads and frying oils to baked goods, frozen foods, and doughnuts.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Remember trans fats? And the big campaigns to get them out of burgers, fries and all kinds of baked goods?

Well, those campaigns seem to have worked.

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9:30am

Thu February 9, 2012

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