4:10pm

Sat June 16, 2012
NPR Story

Gauging The Impact Of Obama's Immigration Policy

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 4:24 pm

President Obama announced major changes in the country's immigration policy on Friday. NPR's Mara Liasson talks with weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden about what the changes are and the political impact they may have this election season.

4:10pm

Sat June 16, 2012
NPR Story

Egypt Faces Tense Election For New President

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 4:24 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

In Egypt, voters went to the polls today to pick a new president to replace Hosni Mubarak, who was ousted in a revolution last year. Voters are casting ballots just a few days after that nation's highest court issued a ruling that dissolves Egypt's first freely elected parliament, which was dominated by Islamists. The latest election is a runoff between an Islamist engineer and Mubarak's last prime minister, the two top vote-getters in the first round of presidential polls held last month.

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3:23pm

Sat June 16, 2012
Arts & Life

Embracing The Quirkiness Of Djuna Barnes

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 6:06 pm

Before publishing the plays and novels she's now known for, women's rights advocate Djuna Barnes was a journalist and illustrator.
Djuna Barnes Papers, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries

A writer, illustrator and provocateur in the Roaring '20s, Djuna Barnes stood out.

"She was much more interested in embracing the quirky and embracing that idea that became so famous in feminist circles half a century later," Catherine Morris says, "the idea that the personal is political."

Morris is the curator of a new exhibition of Barnes' writings and illustrations called "Newspaper Fictions" at the Brooklyn Museum's Sackler Center for Feminist Art.

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11:15am

Sat June 16, 2012
Kee Facts: A Few Things You Didn't Know

Follow The Money: On The Trail Of Watergate Lore

A photograph of the Watergate complex that was used as an exhibit in the trial of G. Gordon Liddy.
National Archives

"Follow the money" – a phrase that's now part of our national lexicon — was supposedly whispered to reporter Bob Woodward by Deep Throat as a way to cut through the lies and deceptions and find the truth about the Watergate scandal. The so-called third-rate burglary that happened 40 years ago this weekend ended the presidency of Richard Nixon. But did Mark Felt, the former associate director of the FBI who admitted to being Deep Throat in 2005, ever really say "follow the money"?

He did not.

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11:03am

Sat June 16, 2012
Music Interviews

Bonnie Raitt: A Brand-New Model For A Classic Sound

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 4:24 pm

Bonnie Raitt's latest album, Slipstream, is the first release on her own Redwing Records label.
Marina Chavez

This April, roots-rock singer-guitarist Bonnie Raitt released her first album in seven years, Slipstream. It's classic Raitt, mixing bluesy slide-guitar riffs with her soulful voice and a pop-friendly sensibility.

The delivery system, however, is brand-new. After years of working with the majors, Raitt decided to start her own label, Redwing Records. Raitt runs Redwing with the help of a tiny staff; Slipstream is the first release in its catalog.

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8:08am

Sat June 16, 2012
The Two-Way

As Violence Escalates, U.N. Suspends Monitoring In Syria

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 5:37 am

A Free Syrian Army fighter fires his weapon during clashes with Syrian troops near Idlib, Syria, on Friday. The U.N. said Saturday it is suspending its mission in Syria because of escalating violence.
Anonymous AP

The U.N. said Saturday it was suspending its monitoring operations in Syria because of an "intensification of armed violence" over the past 10 days.

"Innocent civilians — men, women and children — are being killed everyday," Gen. Robert Mood, head of the U.N. Supervision Mission in Syria, said. "[The violence] also poses a significant risk to my unarmed observers."

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7:55am

Sat June 16, 2012
World

Aung San Suu Kyi Gives Long-Overdue Nobel Speech

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 4:24 pm

Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi gives her acceptance speech in Oslo, Norway, on Saturday. The Burmese opposition leader was awarded the prize two decades ago.
Daniel Sannum Lauten AP

Nobel Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, the opposition leader of Myanmar, also known as Burma, spoke in Norway Saturday, formally accepting the peace prize she was awarded in 1991 while under house arrest. Her supporters portrayed the moment as a belated victory for democracy and human rights.

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7:50am

Sat June 16, 2012
The Salt

The Art Of The Snack, One Illustration At A Time

Part art project, part reference work, the website Snack Data is a quirky, illustrated database of foods.
Beau Johnson snackdata.com

The next time you need some help deciding what to pick for a midday munch, try Snack Data, a quirky, illustrated catalogue of foods. Part reference guide, part art project, it's the latest idiosyncratic creation of Los Angeles-based web developer Beau Johnson.

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7:33am

Sat June 16, 2012
Middle East

Violence Forces U.N. To Halt Mission In Syria

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 1:22 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The United Nations is suspending its observer mission in Syria because of growing violence there. The official announcement came today from the head of the mission, General Robert Mood. The statement released from U.N. headquarters in Damascus cited rising violence over the past 10 days, and charged that both parties - the Syrian military and the armed rebels, known as the Free Syrian Army - are putting civilians lives at risk - and the lives of their monitors. NPR's Deborah Amos is in Damascus. Deborah, thanks for being with us.

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7:14am

Sat June 16, 2012
The Two-Way

Islamist Faces Member Of The Old Guard In Egypt Election

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 5:38 am

A soldier directs a voter inside a polling station on Saturday in Cairo. Egyptians voted Saturday in the country's landmark presidential runoff, choosing between Hosni Mubarak's ex-prime minister and an Islamist candidate from the Muslim Brotherhood after a race that has deeply polarized the nation.
Thomas Hartwell AP

After some unexpected political drama this week, Egyptians are choosing a president Saturday, and the choice reflects the deep divisions in the country that has been unsettled since its revolution last year.

On the one side is Mohammed Morsi, candidate of the Muslim Brotherhood, the Islamic group that dominated the parliamentary elections back in December and January.

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6:48am

Sat June 16, 2012
NPR Story

McConnell Argues Against Requiring Donor Disclosure

Friday Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell said it's time to roll back the Watergate-era requirement for public disclosure of campaign donors. He accused President Obama and liberals of trying to stifle the First Amendment rights of conservative donors.

6:48am

Sat June 16, 2012
NPR Story

Suu Kyi To Accept Nobel Peace Prize, Decades Late

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 1:22 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Aung San Suu Kyi has delivered a speech in Norway to formally accept the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize. The opposition leader of Myanmar, also known as Burma, was delayed giving that speech for 21 years because the country's then ruling military junta had put her under house arrest. In her speech, Aung San Suu Kyi urged the world not to forget prisoners of conscious who, unlike herself, are not free.

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6:48am

Sat June 16, 2012
NPR Story

Voters To Decide Outcome Of Current Greek Drama

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 6:53 pm

Street art by Bleeps.gr are allegories of the effects of the economic crisis on ordinary Greeks.
Sylvia Poggioli NPR

Debt-burdened Greeks go to the polls Sunday to choose between an establishment party, and continuing harsh austerity measures, or a leftist party that vows to replace the current bailout deal with less punishing conditions.

But many Greeks are aware that whatever the outcome, they face years of hardship in a rapidly unraveling society.

A recent TV news report on medicine shortages illustrated the anguish rippling through the country. The piercing screams of a woman in a pharmacy can be heard as she shouts, "Where am I going to find my medication?"

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6:48am

Sat June 16, 2012
NPR Story

Greeks Take Over Reporting As Newspapers Go Under

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 1:22 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The austerity measures in Greece have reached into the journalists who would normally cover these elections. Thousands of journalists have lost their jobs. And in any case, many Greeks feel that the mainstream media are biased, and they're not getting news from alternative citizen-run outlets. Joanna Kakissis reports.

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6:48am

Sat June 16, 2012
NPR Story

Egyptians Vote President To Succeed Mubarak

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 1:22 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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