Local News

Abilene Will Have Sister March On Saturday

Jan 20, 2017

 

The Women’s March on Washington is a grassroots effort that grew to over 600 marches across six continents. Damion Moore will be marching Saturday at city hall in Abilene. He’s marching for issues that affect different groups of people, including disabled people, immigrants, LGBT, women’s rights, religious freedom and more. 

 

For college students practicing Islam it can be challenging to keep a class schedule and pray five times a day, which is required by the faith. McMurry University is making it easier for their Muslim students to worship by providing a prayer room on campus. 

Sultan Albogami and about 45 other Muslim students from Saudi Arabia are very grateful that McMurry granted their request for a prayer room. Now Albogami has a place for his daily prayers and the room helps him show others that Islam is a peaceful religion. 

 

If you’ve never heard of something called “change ringing,” you’re not alone. Change ringing is a musical performance that requires a team of people pulling ropes that ring giant bells in a precise order. It’s more popular in eastern states, but Texas has five churches with a bell tower built for change ringing – including one in Abilene. 

In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, hundreds of Abilene citizens marched on the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Bridge. Young and old people of every race and gender marched and sang together to celebrate civil rights. Nelson Wilson, a Vietnam Veteran and longtime Abilene resident, participated in the first march in 1980. He said each year the march has continued to grow.   

 

Abilene Mayor Norm Archibald said the time has come for him to step aside and let someone else serve the city. Archibald announced his decision not to run again during a city council meeting today.

"I’ve been elected 5 times, I’m very honored, I’m very humbled to have served in this role," Archibald said. "I love Abilene very much." 

 

All Independent school districts in Texas used to be elected at-large, or city-wide. But many districts have switched to a single-member system, saying it creates more diversity among representatives. Abilene ISD has remained at-large despite pressure to change. With an open seat on the board of trustees, the issue has resurfaced. 

At an Abilene ISD public board meeting in June there were a handful of recognitions for successes in athletics, band competitions and leadership experiences. Then it was time for community members to speak. 

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