NPR's Morning Edition

Weekdays, 4am - 9am

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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4:04am

Tue April 24, 2012
NPR Story

Business News

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 6:30 am

Weeks ahead of its initial public offering, Facebook released its first quarter profits Monday, and they are down 12 percent from a year ago. At the same time, company expenses have nearly doubled. Facebook attributes some of that to market expansion, which requires more employees and infrastructure.

4:04am

Tue April 24, 2012
NPR Story

Former Icelandic Leader Tried On Economic Collapse

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 6:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And let's turn now to the first political leader to be put on trial for his role in the global banking crisis. Yesterday, a special court in Iceland found that country's former prime minister guilty of essentially mishandling the banking bubble that led to Iceland's financial collapse.

Michael Stothard has been covering this trial for The Financial Times. He joined us to talk more about it. Good morning.

MICHAEL STOTHARD: Good morning.

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6:49am

Mon April 23, 2012
World

A Year After Tsunami, Japanese Ball Found In Alaska

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A precious piece of his childhood is going back to a teenager in Japan. Misaki Murakami and his family lost everything in last year's tsunami. But waves carried his soccer ball, covered in notes from third grade friends, to a beach in Alaska. David Baxter found it there and his Japanese wife translated the writing, including the teenager's name. It will be the first bit of North American tsunami debris officially returned to Japan. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

6:39am

Mon April 23, 2012
Around the Nation

Rats Are Good Luck For NHL's Florida Panthers

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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5:36am

Mon April 23, 2012
Around the Nation

Artist Tosses Salad For 1,000 People

As a part of Earth Day celebrations, performance artist Alison Knowles took salad making to the extreme in New York City. Knowles chopped romaine lettuce, carrots and cucumbers to the beat of live music. She then tossed the avalanche of salad off a balcony into a giant tarp, where the salad was served up to audience members.

5:36am

Mon April 23, 2012
Afghanistan

Deal Reached On U.S.-Afghan Strategic Partnership

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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5:25am

Mon April 23, 2012
Politics

Charity Status Of Conservative Group Challenged

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 5:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

Opponents have intensified a campaign against a group that drafts and promotes bills for state lawmakers to enact. The American Legislative Exchange Council, or ALEC, says it stands for limited government, free markets and federalism. The corporate-funded group has promoted much debated ideas - from voter ID rules to stand your ground gun laws.

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3:42am

Mon April 23, 2012
Middle East

In Bahrain, Protesters Kept Away From Grand Prix

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 6:27 am

Sebastian Vettel won the Bahrain Grand Prix over the weekend, but in a larger sense the winners were the race organizers. They managed to hold the race which was canceled last year by political unrest, which was part of the uprisings of the Arab Spring. Bill Law, of the British Broadcasting Corporation, talks to Steve Inskeep about the weekend's events in Bahrain.

3:42am

Mon April 23, 2012
Business

Nestle To Buy Pfizer's Infant-Nutrition Line

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 6:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with an acquisition for Nestle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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3:42am

Mon April 23, 2012
Business

Continued Job Growth Will Help Housing Industry

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 5:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Later this week, we get some key data to help judge the state of the nation's housing market. There are some early signs of recovery, but home prices are still falling in many areas, as NPR's Chris Arnold reports.

CHRIS ARNOLD, BYLINE: Tomorrow, we'll get the latest word on home prices from what's called the S&P Case-Shiller index. That keeps showing price declines in many areas. Though those price drops have been leveling off, so things definitely aren't as bad as they were.

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3:42am

Mon April 23, 2012
Europe

State-Owned German Banks Suffer After Risky Investments

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 6:19 am

Unlike the United States, Germany never had a housing bubble. Its mortgage market is too tightly regulated. But some German banks did lose a lot of money in the financial crisis, and they're still paying a big price for it.

3:42am

Mon April 23, 2012
Business

N.C. Company Handcrafts Artisan Jeans In Raleigh

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 8:50 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Back a half-century ago, much of North Carolina's work force, 40 percent, got a paycheck from the textile industry. These days, it's less than 2 percent, with many of those lost jobs going overseas.

But one company - Raleigh Denim - has found a way to thrive in North Carolina, by making blue jeans the old-fashioned way. Here's Laurin Penland with the story.

(SOUNDBITE OF MACHINERY)

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3:42am

Mon April 23, 2012
Business

German Chemical Plant Fire Threatens Auto Backlog

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 5:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Next, we have a tale of globalization, how a single fire at a company in Germany could affect business in Detroit or Shanghai.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The company is a chemical plant in a town called Marl. An explosion there killed two people. It was a tragedy, but did not seem to have global significance.

MONTAGNE: Until car companies realized that Marl is vital to their business. NPR's Sonari Glinton explains.

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3:35am

Mon April 23, 2012
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 6:03 am

The denim store in Kobe, Japan, sells jeans for $350. The store is able to sell a pair of jeans for that price because it's tapped into a Japanese subculture that is obsessed by 1950s Americana.

3:35am

Mon April 23, 2012
Europe

Incumbent Sarkozy Faces French Presidential Runoff

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 5:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Renee Montagne is back with us. Renee, welcome back.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Glad to be back, Steve. Thanks.

Let's begin with one of the most colorful European leaders, who is on the verge of losing his job. Nicolas Sarkozy has walked the world stage with his supermodel wife on his arm.

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