NPR's Morning Edition

Weekdays, 4am - 9am

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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4:14am

Fri May 11, 2012
Election 2012

Romney Apologizes For High School Bullying Incident

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 6:10 am

Mitt Romney's presidential campaign is in damage control mode after an article in The Washington Post accused the candidate of bullying in high school. Romney says he does not remember the incidents. Several of his classmates independently recall him going after students who seemed different, vulnerable or effeminate.

4:14am

Fri May 11, 2012
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 6:40 am

According to a survey by the National Retail Federation, mothers will be treated to a little more this holiday. All told, American consumers are expected to spend about $18.6 billion on the moms, stepmoms or grandmas in their lives.

4:08am

Fri May 11, 2012
NPR Story

Rep. Michele Bachmann Gives Up Swiss Citizenship

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 6:10 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here's an update on a member of Congress who became a multinational person. As we reported yesterday, former Republican presidential candidate Michele Bachmann is Swiss. She became a dual citizen of Switzerland and the U.S. through her husband, Marcus Bachmann, whose parents are Swiss and who recently claimed his Swiss citizenship.

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4:08am

Fri May 11, 2012
NPR Story

JPMorgan Chase Loses $2 Billion In Risky Trades

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 6:10 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

JPMorgan Chase has acknowledged losing at least $2 billion over the last six weeks in an investment strategy that went awry. The losses are a big embarrassment to a bank that's usually seen as one of the best-managed on Wall Street. And the incident is already prompting new calls for tighter restrictions on bank trading.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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4:08am

Fri May 11, 2012
NPR Story

Happy Renters Don't Budge From Homeownership Sidelines

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 6:10 am

U.S. homeownership rates have fallen to their lowest point since 1997, despite the homebuyer tax credit and enduring rock-bottom interest rates. Two years ago on Morning Edition, we profiled two couples who were renting with no regrets. Have they changed their tune?

1:50am

Fri May 11, 2012
Author Interviews

Deford: How Sportswriting Has Changed 'Over Time'

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 6:10 am

Atlantic Monthly Press

NPR listeners normally hear from sports commentator Frank Deford for three minutes at a time Wednesday mornings, as he opines on the latest follies of the sporting world. But Deford fans have been getting to hear the veteran sportswriter at greater length lately. He's on a book tour for his new memoir, Over Time: My Life as a Sportswriter. When Deford stopped in Washington, D.C., NPR's Steve Inskeep had the chance to interview him in front of a lively crowd.

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6:45am

Thu May 10, 2012
Business

Brad Pitt Is The New Face Of Chanel No. 5 Ads

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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6:39am

Thu May 10, 2012
Around the Nation

Accidental Calls To New York City's 911 Add Up

A report says in 2010, 38 percent of 911 calls in New York City were accidental calls lasting just seconds. Most, according to the New York Daily News, appear to be calls made from pockets or purses. There were actually more of these calls than calls that warranted a response by a police car.

5:27am

Thu May 10, 2012
Around the Nation

Ohio Bill Would Ban Exotic Animals As Pets

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

For the most part, of course, what you do at home is your business. But a tragedy in Ohio has authorities legislating the question of which animals people keep at home. An Ohio TV station, NewsChannel5, was on the story last week.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWSCHANNEL5 BROADCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Our other top story Live on Five: Five exotic animals were returned to a farm in Zanesville.

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3:48am

Thu May 10, 2012
Business

Business News

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 6:28 am

The Federal Reserve has announced three of China's largest state-owned banks have been given approval to expand their operations in the U.S. Analysts say that ICBC, China investment Corp., and Central Huijin Investment will likely look to purchase regional U.S. banks and establish a footprint in the American market.

3:48am

Thu May 10, 2012
Business

GOP Governors Debate Health Exchanges

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 6:08 am

States are moving to set up health insurance exchanges — a pillar of Obama's health care law. But many GOP governors find themselves in an awkward position. David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, talks to Steve Inskeep about why the governors' positions on exchanges are complicated.

1:57am

Thu May 10, 2012
Movies

'Dark Shadows': The Birth Of The Modern TV Vampire

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 10:20 am

In the influential Dark Shadows, a 1960s ABC soap opera with a gothic and supernatural bent, Jonathan Frid played Barnabas Collins, a vampire who returned to claim his coastal Maine manor.
Dan Curtis Productions The Kobal Collection

When it comes to monsters on television, vampires have the market more or less cornered. Think about it: Buffy the Vampire Slayer, True Blood, The Vampire Diaries ...

Vampires' enduring popularity on TV may not be eternal, but they have been appearing on the small screen for decades. Mark Dawidziak, who's written books about vampires and teaches a class at Kent State University on their appearances in film and TV, says that part of the way vampires have remained a force in popular culture is through their evolution on TV.

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10:04pm

Wed May 9, 2012
The Two-Way

Pew Study: Americans In The Northeast Have More Economic Mobility

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 3:48 am

A new study from the Pew Charitable Trusts finds economic mobility differs significantly across the United States. The report finds Americans are more likely to move up the economic ladder if they live in the northeast.

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6:48am

Wed May 9, 2012
Around the Nation

French Artist's Painting Sells for $36 Million

Yves Klein made his project "FC1" with water, a blowtorch and two models. The women pressed their wet figures against a fire-resistant board, then stepped away. Afterward, Klein torched the board — an effect that left behind blurry silhouettes of models.

6:38am

Wed May 9, 2012
Sports

Texas Ranger Josh Hamilton Hits 4 Homers In 1 Game

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

In the history of Major League Baseball, only 15 players have hit four homeruns in a single game. Well, last night, Texas Rangers slugger Josh Hamilton became Number 16. He hit four balls out of the park at Camden Yards in Baltimore. Orioles' fans weren't happy. Hamilton's Rangers were trouncing their team. Still, they gave Hamilton a standing ovation as he took his place in center field in the eighth inning. As Hamilton put it, that let's you know they are true baseball fans.

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