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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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2:29am

Tue August 21, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

High School Daze: The Perils of Sacrificing Sleep for Late-Night Studying

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 8:01 am

It may not be the best strategy to stay up late and cram. A new study finds that when teens don't get the sleep they need, all kinds of things can go poorly.
iStockphoto.com

High school students with heavy academic course loads often find the demands of homework colliding with the need for adequate sleep.

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2:28am

Tue August 21, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Health Law Gives Medicare Fraud Fighters New Weapons

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 8:01 am

With help from the Affordable Care Act, government fraud investigators will make more use of computer programs to detect Medicare and Medicaid scams.
iStockphoto.com

Fighting health care fraud in the U.S. can seem like an endless game of Whack-a-Mole. When government fraud squads crack down on one scheme, another pops up close by.

But the fraud squads that look for scams in the federal Medicare and Medicaid programs have some new weapons: tools and funding provided by the Affordable Care Act.

Medicare and Medicaid pay out some $750 billion each year to more than 1.5 million doctors, hospitals and medical suppliers. By many estimates, about $65 billion a year is lost to fraud.

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12:50pm

Mon August 20, 2012
Business

Aetna To Buy Coventry Health Care

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Changes in the health insurance industry are at the top of NPR's business news.

The giant insurance company Aetna plans to get a little bigger. It's buying Coventry Health Care for more than $5.5 billion. Now, if you want to know why, consider the changing landscape in which Aetna does business. Medicaid is expanding under President Obama's health care law, Medicare is expanding as Americans grow older, and those government-run plans include many opportunities for private insurance companies.

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6:15am

Mon August 20, 2012
Around the Nation

N.Y. Library's Toilet Paper To Feature Ads

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:50 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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6:15am

Mon August 20, 2012
Europe

BBC Weatherman Apologizes For Inaccurate Forecast

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:50 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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6:15am

Mon August 20, 2012
Analysis

Republicans Get Ready For Party's Convention

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:50 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Next week, Mitt Romney's campaign seeks to introduce Paul Ryan again. Even before the selection of the Republican vice presidential choice, President Obama's campaign had been working to define Ryan as extreme on issues from Medicare to abortion. What happens next week is that Romney and Ryan take the stage at the Republican National Convention, one of several things that will happen there.

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4:19am

Mon August 20, 2012
Around the Nation

Janesville Library Prepared For Inquiring Reporters

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:50 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

For the residents of Janesville, Wisconsin, Mitt Romney's selection of Paul Ryan as his running mate was a story of a local man becoming the biggest news in the country. But for the librarians of Janesville, it meant something else entirely, as NPR's Don Gonyea found out last week.

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3:38am

Mon August 20, 2012
Asia

India Accuses Pakistani Websites Of Inciting Panic

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:50 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

India's government has persuaded companies to shut down more than 150 websites. Authorities blame those sites for circulating claims that led to panic. The claims fueled fears of violence during the Muslim festival of Eid. NPR's Julie McCarthy reports.

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3:30am

Mon August 20, 2012
Remembrances

Tony Scott's Death Probed As Suicide

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:50 pm

Tony Scott's breakout hit was Top Gun, a drama about fighter pilots in training, starring Tom Cruise.
AP

When people talk about Tony Scott's movies, the same words often come up: stylish, exuberant and kinetic. Three years ago, in a video interview with The Guardian, Scott explained why watching his movies could sometimes be exhausting.

"I have this natural energy that I want to inject into what I do," he said. "The worlds that I touch, I sort of embrace those worlds, and I always look for that energetic side of the worlds that I'm touching."

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3:30am

Mon August 20, 2012
Politics

Weekend Campaign News

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:50 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's listen to the words that made Todd Akin a lot more famous over the weekend. The Republican congressman from Missouri is running for United States Senate. He was probably no better known nationally than the average Senate challenger until he gave an interview to St. Louis TV station KTVI. He was asked why he opposes abortion in nearly all cases, including rape.

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3:30am

Mon August 20, 2012
Middle East

Syrian Refugees Burden Neighboring Turkey

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:50 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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3:25am

Mon August 20, 2012
NPR Story

Bo Xilai's Wife Gets Suspended Death Sentence

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:50 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's go next to China, where the wife of a fallen Communist Party leader has received a sentence - a suspended death sentence for murdering a British businessman. Her accomplice, a family employee, was sentenced to nine years in prison. Gu Kailai came under suspicion after a scandal involving her husband, who was one of the rising stars of the Communist Party before he lost his job amid suspicions about his behavior. NPR's Frank Langfitt has been following this case from Shanghai.

Hi, Frank.

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3:25am

Mon August 20, 2012
NPR Story

Afghan Attacks Continue Against Coalition Allies

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:50 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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3:25am

Mon August 20, 2012
NPR Story

Business News

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:52 pm

American is currently seeking to cut costs in bankruptcy protection so the flight attendants' union pushed hard for this vote — warning that rejecting the contract could mean even deeper cuts or furloughs. The company's trying to cut about a billion dollars in labor costs. Mechanics and other union workers had previously accepted new contracts but pilots rejected American's latest offer earlier this month.

2:26am

Mon August 20, 2012
Crime In The City

Robert Crais: LA Is A 'Natural Canvas' For Nightmare

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:50 pm

The canals in LA's Venice neighborhood serve as the scene of a murder in Robert Crais' 2011 novel, The Sentry.
David McNew Getty Images

It's been a few decades, and many published books, but Robert Crais can tell you exactly when mystery writing first caught his attention: He was a bright 15-year-old living in Baton Rouge, La., when he read Raymond Chandler's The Little Sister, which depicted the shady side of sunny Los Angeles through the eyes of private investigator Philip Marlowe.

Since then, Crais has found huge success with his own crime novels, also set in LA. The city is the perfect canvas for a modern mystery, and Crais' eyes still grow wide when he talks about what Chandler painted on it.

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