NPR's Morning Edition

Weekdays, 4am - 9am

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
51827853e1c80fb1127d2ee8|51827847e1c80fb1127d2eb2

Pages

4:56am

Thu August 30, 2012
Business

Business News

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 6:44 am

The more than $3.5 billion deal was signed during a visit to China by German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

4:46am

Thu August 30, 2012
Around the Nation

View Of Isaac From Mandeville, La.

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 5:39 am

Marlaine Peachey works in the mayor's office in Mandeville, La. During severe weather she mans the office 24-7. She tells Steve Inskeep that Hurricane Issac was a water event they didn't expect.

4:46am

Thu August 30, 2012
Around the Nation

Effects Of Issac Linger, Power Is Out For Many

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 5:26 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

It is the wind that defines the strength of a hurricane. The storm is not a hurricane at all until the wind reaches 74 miles per hour. Hurricane Isaac's sustained winds were not much beyond that, so it was a Category 1 storm, not two, three, four or five. But if the winds define a hurricane, it's the water that can do the most damage.

Read more

4:46am

Thu August 30, 2012
Election 2012

Romney Courts Veterans At American Legion Convention

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 6:00 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, as Isaac moves north from Louisiana, it could affect other parts of the country, and we'll be following that story as it develops.

The other big story we have been following this week is the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida. Today is the final day, and it's an important one for GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney. He'll officially accept the nomination this evening. Yesterday, Romney took a break from the hubbub of the convention to do a little campaigning elsewhere. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports on his getaway.

Read more

2:21am

Thu August 30, 2012
Planet Money

What The Apollo Astronauts Did For Life Insurance

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 3:48 pm

A astronaut cover signed by Neil Armstrong.
via collectspace.com

This week, Americans have been remembering Neil Armstrong. But before he walked on the moon, he had to solve a much more prosaic problem.

"You're about to embark on a mission that's more dangerous than anything any human has ever done before," Robert Pearlman, a space historian and collector with collectspace.com, told me. "And you have a family that you're leaving behind on Earth, and there's a real chance you will not be returning."

Read more

2:19am

Thu August 30, 2012
The Salt

Subtracting Calories May Not Add Years To Life

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 9:34 am

A rhesus monkey eats watermelon, provided by zookeepers, at the Kamla Nehru Zoological Gardens in India in May 2012.
Sam Panthaky AFP/Getty Images

Scientists have known for decades that lab rats and mice will live far longer than normal if they're fed a super-low-calorie diet, and that's led some people to eat a near-starvation diet in the hopes that it will extend the human life span, too.

But a new study in monkeys suggests they may be disappointed.

The long-awaited results of this study, which started back in 1987, show that rhesus monkeys fed a diet with 30 percent fewer calories than normal did not live unusually long lives.

Read more

2:18am

Thu August 30, 2012
Sports

Doing It To Win: Veterans Raise Bar At Paralympics

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 10:22 am

U.S. rowers Rob Jones and Oksana Masters train at the Rivanna Reservoir in Charlottesville, Va. The pair will compete in adaptive rowing at the London Paralympics this week. Jones, a former U.S. Marine, lost both legs to an improvised land mine in southern Afghanistan.
David Gilkey NPR

On a placid summer morning last month, before the Virginia heat could hit them, a former U.S. Marine and his partner lifted their rowing scull into the glassy water of the Rivanna River, near Charlottesville.

"First thing I do is take these legs off," said Rob Jones, who like his rowing partner, Oksana Masters, is a double, above-the-knee amputee. They're the U.S. team for mixed-doubles rowing at the 2012 London Paralympics, which started Wednesday.

Read more

11:08am

Wed August 29, 2012
U.S.

FEMA's Fugate On Isaac's Progress, Response

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 3:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

We've been hearing, all morning, reports of Hurricane Isaac coming ashore along the gulf coast, and we're going, now, to Craig Fugate. He is the FEMA Administrator, the Federal Emergency Management Agency - and he is spending the morning on the gulf coast. Mr. Fugate, where are you now?

Read more

8:07am

Wed August 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Flooding Strands Residents In Plaquemines Parish

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 3:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, Greg mentioned Plaquemines Parish. Look at a map of Louisiana and you'll see that parish, a finger of land sticking far out into the Gulf of Mexico. Jennifer Hale of WVUE Television is in the parish, spent the night there. And Ms. Hale, where are you now?

Read more

7:50am

Wed August 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Even At Category 1, Isacc Packs A Punch

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 3:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Hurricane Isaac made landfall last night in Louisiana and it is battering the Gulf Coast with high winds and a lot of rain. For the latest we turn to NPR's Greg Allen. He's in New Orleans and we have reached him by telephone. And Greg, give us a sense of this storm. It sounds like, you know, Category 1, which, you know, makes you not worry so much, but a lot of people fearing that it could just stay in one place for a good while.

Read more

7:36am

Wed August 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Missing Tourist In Iceland Finds Herself

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 3:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Read more

7:35am

Wed August 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Larry Bird Looms Large Over Magic Johsnon

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 3:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Finally, Larry Bird looms larger than Magic Johnson. The two players fought a famous rivalry in the '80s. Bird's Celtics and Johnson's Lakers battled for NBA titles again and again. But one thing could never change. In the college championship game in 1979, Johnson's Michigan State beat Bird's Indiana State. Now, Indiana State plans a 15-foot tall statue of Larry Bird, larger than any existing statue of Magic Johnson. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

5:55am

Wed August 29, 2012
Around the Nation

South Carolina Drenched By Isaac Spinoff

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 3:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Hurricane Isaac has produced what TV writers might call a spin off - a second storm detached itself from the hurricane and its effects are being felt far from the Gulf Coast.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This mass of moist air detached itself from Isaac and moved up the Atlantic Coast, and yesterday dumped nearly eight inches of rain over South Carolina. The rain caused flooding in Charleston, including the city's historic downtown market. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

5:43am

Wed August 29, 2012
Business

Business News

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 3:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with upping the oil output.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: The group of seven most industrialized nations are urging oil producing countries to ramp up production. In a statement yesterday, the so-called G-7 nations warned of the risks, quote, "posed by elevated oil prices." Demand for gasoline usually starts to wane at the end of the summer but right now gasoline prices are hitting new highs. Oil prices are surging because of tensions with Iran and the ongoing concern about Hurricane Isaac.

Read more

5:43am

Wed August 29, 2012
Asia

Chinese Blame Failed Infrastructure On Corruption

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 3:04 am

Eight bridges have collapsed around China since 2011. Here, government investigators examine a recently built entrance ramp that collapsed last week in the northeastern city of Harbin, killing three people. Local residents believe government corruption and substandard materials are to blame.
Frank Langfitt NPR

When the Yangmingtan bridge opened in the northeastern Chinese city of Harbin in November, local officials hailed it as a grand achievement.

The bridge stretched more than nine miles and cost nearly $300 million. Construction was supposed to take three years, but workers finished in half that time.

"A lot of comrades didn't go home for more than a year, never took a holiday, never took off a weekend," Yang Qingwei, the party secretary of a bridge construction company, proudly told Heilongjiang provincial TV.

Read more

Pages