NPR's Morning Edition

Weekdays, 4am - 9am

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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5:54am

Wed March 20, 2013
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 8:30 am

Twinkies, Ho Hos and Ding Dongs will go to a pair of private equity firms. Wonder Bread will be sold to snack food maker Flowers Food. The Beefsteak brand of bread will go to a Mexican company.

5:54am

Wed March 20, 2013
NPR Story

Dramatic Testimony Marks Start Of Guatemalan Genocide Trial

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 8:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's hear now about a dramatic trial in Guatemala. That country's former dictator is charged with genocide and crimes against humanity, stemming from the killings that happened in the early 1980s. Seventeen hundred indigenous Guatemalans - the Ixils people - died during one of the bloodiest periods of the country's three-decade-long war, a war that ultimately claimed more than 200,000 lives. At the time the U.S.-backed strongman, Ephraim Rios Montt, ruled the country.

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2:18am

Wed March 20, 2013
Sports

Good Luck With That 'Perfect' March Madness Bracket. You'll Need It

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 8:30 am

Kansas center Jeff Withey (left) and Kentucky guard Darius Miller battle under the boards during the second half of the NCAA championship on April 2, 2012.
Mark Humphrey AP

Basketball fans have one more day to fill out their March Madness brackets. They'll need to predict not just the champions and their route to victory, but also the paths of all the losers. It's not easy. In fact, no person or computer has yet been able to do it.

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2:16am

Wed March 20, 2013
Guns In America: A Loaded Relationship

How To Be The Good Guy With A Gun At School

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 8:30 am

Stockton Unified School District Police Officer Myra Franco and Chief Jim West patrol 50 schools in California's Central Valley region. One of the campuses was the site of a 1989 shooting massacre.
Richard Gonzales NPR

Ever since the Newtown, Ct., school shooting, there's been a raging debate over how to keep America's schoolchildren safe. National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre proposed stationing an armed guard in every school in the country. Critics said that idea was impractical and would be too expensive to carry out.

But many schools and school districts already have armed police officers. Since the Columbine High School massacre in 1999, about one-third of the schools in the U.S. have added some kind of armed security, according to federal data.

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2:09am

Wed March 20, 2013
Shots - Health News

Law Says Insurers Should Pay For Breast Pumps, But Which Ones?

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 8:30 am

Some insurers prefer to pay for manual breast pumps, but some working moms prefer more expensive, electric models.
iStockphoto.com

Pediatricians and health officials are eager to encourage breast-feeding as one of the best and most economical ways to protect a baby's health.

To that end, the federal Affordable Care Act requires that health insurance plans provide new mothers with equipment and services to help make those feedings easier.

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2:08am

Wed March 20, 2013
National Security

Off The Battlefield, Military Women Face Risks From Male Troops

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 8:30 am

Jamie Livingston was sexually abused while serving in the Navy. She now lives in El Paso, Texas.
David Gilkey NPR

Dora Hernandez gave a decade of her life to the U.S. Navy and the Army National Guard, but some of the dangers surprised her.

"The worst thing for me is that you don't have to worry about the enemy, you have to worry about your own soldiers," she says.

Sitting in a circle, a group of women nod in agreement. All are veterans, most have spent time in Iraq and Afghanistan, but they're also survivors of another war. According to the Pentagon's own research, more than 1 in 4 women who join the military will be sexually assaulted during their careers.

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2:07am

Wed March 20, 2013
Economy

For Some Ready To Buy, A Good Home Is Hard To Find

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 8:30 am

Bove gets text alerts of new homes coming on the market.
Lauren Rock for NPR

The first day of spring typically signals the high season for open houses and home sales.

The season seems to have arrived early in some places where homebuying is already frenzied, and in many markets, the pendulum has swung from an excess of homes on the market a few years ago to a shortage.

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9:03pm

Tue March 19, 2013
Sweetness And Light

What's The Score On Spirited Sports Banter At Bars?

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 8:30 am

iStockphoto.com

The more I travel, the more I see sports bars. They've been around for years, usually in obvious places, like in college towns or near arenas.

But now they're everywhere, even in airports and hotels, places where you'd expect generic bars. Sports bars are becoming ubiquitous and ordinary — merely, as my wife calls them, public man caves.

All bars, of course, have forever been places where men talk about sports. Other prime saloon subjects include women, the traffic and the weather.

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8:38am

Tue March 19, 2013
Europe

Cyprus Proposes Exempting Smaller Deposits From Tax

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 9:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Lawmakers in Cyprus are trying to ease rage over a proposed tax on all bank deposits by exempting people who have relatively small accounts. It's part of a bailout plan for that Mediterranean country negotiated with the E.U. and IMF over the weekend, but the compromise on taxes may not be enough for Cyprus' parliament to pass the plan.

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6:52am

Tue March 19, 2013
Religion

Installation Mass Launches Pope Francis' Papacy

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 9:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELLS RINGING)

INSKEEP: That's the sound of bells in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, as Pope Francis celebrated his inaugural Mass today. The ceremony was infused with meaning, both in the substance of what the new pope said and the symbolism of how he was presented.

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli joins us on the line from Rome.

Hi, Sylvia.

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6:52am

Tue March 19, 2013
Around the Nation

Broncos Cut Player After Missed Contract Deadline

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 9:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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6:52am

Tue March 19, 2013
Around the Nation

A Guilty Conscience Needs No Accuser

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 9:45 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

A guilty conscience needs no accuser. The Barry County Sheriff's Department in Michigan received $1,200 in cash yesterday with an emotional letter. The writer admitted stealing $800 from a convenience store some 30 years ago; writing, quote, "I can't begin to say how sorry I am, but have lived with this guilt too long."

A noble gesture but keeping up with inflation, the robber would technically owe another $600.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

3:43am

Tue March 19, 2013
Iraq

1 Decade Since The War, Where Iraq Stands Now

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 11:00 am

An Iraqi policeman stands guard at a checkpoint decorated with plastic flowers in Baghdad in 2008.
Ali Yussef AFP/Getty Images

Ten years after the U.S.-led war in Iraq, NPR is looking at where the country stands now. NPR's Kelly McEvers recently visited Baghdad and offered this take on how the Iraqi capital feels today.

I think the single word that would best describe Baghdad these days is traffic. It can take hours just to get from one place to another. And I guess that's both good and bad.

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3:43am

Tue March 19, 2013
Research News

What Is The Effect Of Asking Americans To Think About The Greater Good?

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 9:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

When President Obama recently called for stricter gun control laws, he started out by saying this.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: This is the land of the free, and it always will be.

INSKEEP: The land of the free, he said. But he added this.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

OBAMA: We don't live in isolation. We live in a society, a government of and by and for the people. We are responsible for each other.

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3:43am

Tue March 19, 2013
Politics

RNC Election Report Calls For Minority Outreach, Primary Changes

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 9:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the Republican Party has issued a blistering assessment of why it lost the 2012 election. The Republican National Committee Growth and Opportunity Project told the party that if it wants to win national elections in the future, it needs to change the way it communicates with voters and runs its campaigns.

NPR's Mara Liasson reports.

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