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Morning Edition

Weekdays, 4am - 9am
  • Hosted by Renée Montagne, Steve Inskeep

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Pressure is mounting against Alabama's "toughest in the nation" immigration law. Nearly 3,000 immigrants converged Monday night on a church with strong ties to the civil rights movement. They heard from democratic members of Congress who vowed to get the law repealed.

The Last Word In Business

Nov 22, 2011

The jobs website Careerbuilder.com reports nearly one in five workers said they plan to celebrate the holiday with coworkers. The survey asked workers who they would rather spend Thanksgiving with, and only 1 percent answered coworkers. Ninety percent said family. The remaining 9 percent answered neither.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer in for Renee Montagne.

Clashes between protestors and security forces continue across Egypt. That's despite an offer last night by the interim civilian cabinet to resign.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The latest protests began when Egypt's military tried to strengthen its own power in any future government. Egypt's military is hardly the only army to assume an outsized role in a supposedly democratic country.

And we're going to talk about that with Vali Nasr of Tufts University, author of "The Rise of Islamic Capitalism" and a former advisor to the Obama administration. He's in our studios. Good morning, Vali.

VALI NASR: Good morning.

Director Michel Hazanavicius met me at the Bradbury building in downtown L.A. It's the location of a key scene in his audacious new movie The Artist, which takes place just at the moment when talking pictures supersede silent films.

"It's mythic," said Hazanavicius of the era during which Charlie Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford were stars.

In the scene shot here, a dashing film star reminiscent of Fairbanks bumps into his lovely young protégé on the building's remarkable staircase. He's on his way down; she's on her way up.

Boring Conference Tickets Are Hot Sellers

Nov 21, 2011

The second annual Boring Conference was held over the weekend in London. It began as a joke but tickets sold out this year. Organizer James Ward worried his event might be too interesting.

Neil Parry was arrested at an airport in Darwin, Australia, and was accused of stuffing drugs into bottles of shampoo. Parry spent three days in jail, but has now received $100,000 in compensation. Testing of the bottles of Pantene shampoo and conditioner showed they actually contained: just shampoo and conditioner.

Video shot by Occupy protesters shows people linking arms and sitting down to block a sidewalk on the campus of California Davis. A campus police officer steps up with an oversized spray can and calmly douses them with pepper spray. Two campus police officers have been placed on administrative leave, the university says.

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