All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-6pm, Saturdays 4-5pm, Sundays 5-6pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert SiegelMichele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATCexpanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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3:59pm

Fri April 11, 2014
Deep In The Heart Of (A Transforming) Texas

LBJ Carried Poor Texas Town With Him In Civil Rights Fight

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 12:34 am

Long before he was president, Lyndon Johnson taught in Cotulla, Texas. He is pictured here with students in 1928.
Courtesy of LBJ Library

3:06pm

Fri April 11, 2014
All Tech Considered

Can't Ask That? Some Job Interviewers Go To Social Media Instead

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 12:49 pm

In the hiring process, there are things employers aren't permitted to ask, like whether you plan to have kids. Some employers turn to social media to learn more about job candidates.
iStockphoto

Many of Don Kluemper's management students at the University of Illinois at Chicago have had this experience: After going on a job interview, they sometimes receive "friend" requests from their interviewers.

It puts the students in a bind, he says. They fear that not accepting the request might hurt their job chances, but they also feel compelled to scrub their profiles before accepting.

"They didn't know why they were being friended," Kluemper says. "If it was some personal request or if the person was going to be screening their profile."

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3:06pm

Fri April 11, 2014
Business

GM Recall Distrust Trickles Down To Dealers

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 7:13 pm

The General Motors recall puts its dealerships in an uncomfortable spot, having to placate customers as both parties wait for replacement parts to arrive. Brian Bull of WCPN reports that many are reconsidering whether they'll ever buy a GM car again.

3:06pm

Fri April 11, 2014
Sports

NBA Commish Wades Into Debate Over Paying College Players

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 7:13 pm

New NBA commissioner Adam Silver made news by suggesting the league's willingness to pay college basketball players. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis explains what might mean for professionals and students.

6:09pm

Thu April 10, 2014
News

Sebelius, Leader Of Rocky Health Care Rollout, Resigns From HHS

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 7:12 pm

Kathleen Sebelius has resigned from her position as secretary of health and human services. President Obama accepted her resignation, and he plans to nominate Sylvia Matthews Burwell to replace her.

4:28pm

Thu April 10, 2014
Found Recipes

Americans, Just Get Over It And Make The Souffle

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 11:41 am

Even one fluffy forkful of souffle is a worthy reward for making the effort.
Kelly Gorham Courtesy of Kelly Gorham Photography

The souffle shares this in common with some of nature's most vicious predators: It can sense fear. This, at least, according to noted American chef James Beard, who once observed, "The only thing that will make a souffle fall is if it knows you're afraid of it."

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4:21pm

Thu April 10, 2014
Law

For Albuquerque PD, A Searing Rebuke From Justice Department

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 7:12 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The Justice Department issued a scathing report today on the Albuquerque Police Department's use of force. Albuquerque officers have shot and killed 23 people in the last four years. Many of the victims were mentally or emotionally unstable. The report says the department has systemic deficiencies that caused the deaths and many other incidents. NPR's Ted Robbins has the story.

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4:21pm

Thu April 10, 2014
Book Reviews

After A Disaster In 'Family Life,' Relief Never Comes

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 7:12 pm

iStockphoto

Some things in life are just too painful to accept, and the same is true in novels. Family Life is the story of the Mishras, who immigrate to the U.S. in the late 1970s from India. Their departure is such a big deal that townspeople gather around just to have a look at their airplane tickets. Expectations of the life that awaits them start to build. "Americans clean themselves with paper, not water," says a classmate of the younger Mishra brother, Ajay, who narrates the novel. "In America, they say 'yeah' not yes," the boy goes on. To which Ajay replies, "That's nothing.

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3:08pm

Thu April 10, 2014
News

Utah Gay Marriage Gets Hearing In Appeals Court

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 7:12 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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3:08pm

Thu April 10, 2014
Science

A Peek Beneath A Mummy's Wrappers, Powered By CT Scanners

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 7:12 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Did you hear the one about the mummy who went to the hospital? Don't get all wrapped up trying to figure out the punch line, this is no joke. It's part of some groundbreaking research that will be on display at London's British Museum next month. The team there is using CT scans to uncover the ancient secrets of mummies.

John Taylor is curator at the British Museum. And he joined me earlier today to explain.

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3:08pm

Thu April 10, 2014
Middle East

As Refugees Stream In, Lebanon Copes With Human Flood Tide

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 7:12 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

The United Nations has now registered more than a million refugees who have fled the war in Syria and gone to Lebanon. There are many more who have gone to other countries, but this massive flow of people creates a perilous situation for Syria's tiny next door neighbor. Lebanon's own security is always fragile and its resources, like water, are in short supply.

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5:36pm

Wed April 9, 2014
Environment

Why Do Some Clouds Drop Rain, While Others Don't?

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:48 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Recent storms in California haven't been enough to save the state from a serious drought. And now, the rainy season is winding down. Scientists are trying to understand why some storms unload lots of rain and snow in California and others don't. As Lauren Sommer reports from member station KQED in San Francisco, there could be a link to dust storms thousands of miles away.

LAUREN SOMMER, BYLINE: The sky over the Pacific Ocean is looking pretty ominous - big dark gray clouds in the distance.

I think it feels like rain.

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4:32pm

Wed April 9, 2014
All Tech Considered

What To Do Now That The Heartbleed Bug Exposed The Internet

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 10:27 am

The Heartbleed bug has exposed up to two-thirds of the Internet to a security vulnerability.
iStockphoto

With a name like Heartbleed, it's no surprise it's bad. A vulnerability in OpenSSL — the Internet's most commonly used cryptographic library — has been bleeding out information, 64 kilobytes at a time, since March 2012.

"I would classify it as possibly the top bug that has hit the Internet that I've encountered, because of it being so widespread, because it's so hard to detect," says Andy Grant, a security analyst at iSEC Partners.

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4:27pm

Wed April 9, 2014
Around the Nation

Out Of The Rubble Of Tragedy, How To Build A New Sandy Hook?

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:48 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Newtown, Connecticut, is moving forward with plans to rebuild Sandy Hook Elementary School. The original building where gunman Adam Lanza shot and killed 20 children and six adults was demolished late last year. The process of designing a new school, one that both honors the wishes of the community and provides a new home for learning, lies with architect Barry Svigals. Svigals and his design team recently unveiled their plans at a town meeting in Newtown, and he joins us now to talk more about it. Welcome to the program.

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4:27pm

Wed April 9, 2014
Planet Money

Across The Atlantic, Glimpse An Alternate Internet Universe

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 8:53 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Already for many Americans, there are few options when it comes to high-speed broadband. And the reason, says Zoe Chace with our Planet Money team, goes back to a moment when the U.S. decided to go one way and the rest of the world went another.

ZOE CHACE, BYLINE: That moment, March 14th, 2002, a bunch of people from the Federal Communications Commission pondering an existential question. There's this brand-new cable coming into your home with the Internet on it. What is this thing?

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