All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-6pm, Saturdays 4-5pm, Sundays 5-6pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert SiegelMichele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATCexpanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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4:03pm

Wed June 6, 2012
Business

Good Times For Airlines, So Where Are The Deals?

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 6:29 pm

A Delta Air Lines flight takes off from the Ronald Regan National Airport in Washington, D.C. As the price of oil trickles down, the airline industry is projected to have a historic good year.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

The rest of the economy may not be doing great, but airlines are expecting a banner year. Profitability is up and fuel prices are declining, but that's not necessarily great news for consumers.

When Robert Herbst, a former pilot and industry consultant for many years, says the skies are blue, it sounds pretty convincing. And from Herbst's projections, this may be a historic year for the airline industry.

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3:50pm

Wed June 6, 2012
Europe

Spain Needs Cash, But Please Don't Call It A Bailout

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 6:29 pm

A Spanish protester bangs on a pot outside the offices of Bankia in Madrid. Spain's banks are hurting and in need of an infusion of capital.
Pablo Blazquez Dominguez Getty Images

Spain's banks are struggling and the country's leaders are sending mixed signals about whether they can afford to rescue them, or whether they'll need to ask for outside help.

But one thing is clear: Spanish leaders are trying to avoid calling any potential rescue plan a bailout.

Spain's Economy Minister Luis de Guindos dismisses talk of a bailout for Spanish banks.

"We'll make whatever decisions we need in the future," De Guindos told reporters in Brussels. And that won't be for weeks, after audits of Spanish banks, he said.

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3:40pm

Wed June 6, 2012
NPR Story

Barrett Loses Rematch In Wis. Recall Election

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 6:29 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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3:09pm

Wed June 6, 2012
The Record

George Clinton Fights For His Right To Funk

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:43 pm

A contemporary Clinton sans dreadlocks.
William Thoren

2:27pm

Wed June 6, 2012
Election 2012

N.D. Senate Race Could Be Next National Battleground

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 6:29 pm

Democratic Senate candidate Heidi Heitkamp greets a supporter before a town hall meeting in Minot, N.D., on May 3.
Dale Wetzel AP

Republicans need a net pickup of four seats to win control of the U.S. Senate this November. One opportunity they see is in North Dakota, where longtime Democratic incumbent Kent Conrad has decided not to run for a sixth term.

Republican Rep. Rick Berg is expected to win the GOP nomination in next Tuesday's primary. If he does, he'll face Democrat Heidi Heitkamp.

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1:44pm

Wed June 6, 2012
Music Reviews

Japandroids: One Part Classic Rock, One Part Punk

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 11:39 am

Japandroids is guitarist Brian King (left) and drummer David Prowse.
Simone Cecchetti

The rock band Japandroids is two men, not from Tokyo but from Vancouver, British Columbia — guitarist Brian King and drummer David Prowse. Both of them sang and very often shouted on their 2009 LP Post-Nothing, which received a lot of praise from music blogs. Their second album is out now; it's called Celebration Rock, and I think it's the best rock record I've heard this year.

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12:24pm

Wed June 6, 2012
The Two-Way

Delta CEO Pushes For National Airline Policy That Lets 'Free Market Work'

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 6:29 pm

A traveler walks by a Delta Airlines skycap kiosk at San Francisco International Airport.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

"Airlines are expecting a banner year," NPR's Yuki Noguchi is due to report on All Things Considered later today.

More planes are flying with full passenger loads, as any frequent flier will tell you. Mergers have helped cut costs. Ticket prices are up. Airlines are charging fees for bags. Fuel costs have eased a bit.

In these relatively good times, what does an airline CEO want?

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11:22am

Wed June 6, 2012
Remembrances

'Fahrenheit 451' Author Ray Bradbury Dies At 91

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:17 pm

Ray Bradbury's career spanned more than 70 years — during which he transported readers to other dimensions with his futuristic and innovative stories. He died Tuesday at age 91.
Lennox McLendon AP

Ray Bradbury, author of The Martian Chronicles and Fahrenheit 451, died Tuesday. He was 91. Bradbury was known for his futuristic tales — but he never used a computer, or even drove a car.

Bradbury was born in Waukegan, Ill., in 1920 and grew up during the Great Depression. He said it was a time when people couldn't imagine the future, and his active imagination made him stand out. He once told Fresh Air's Terry Gross about exaggerating basic childhood fears, like monsters at the top of the stairs.

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6:50pm

Tue June 5, 2012
Politics

Walker, Barrett Await Results In Wis. Recall

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 6:53 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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6:32pm

Tue June 5, 2012
Politics

Wis. Voters Turn Out In Droves For Recall Election

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 6:53 pm

Robert Siegel talks with Don Gonyea and David Schaper about the state's recall election.

6:02pm

Tue June 5, 2012
All Tech Considered

Apple To Google Maps: We Have Our Own App For That

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 7:25 pm

Apple's late CEO, Steve Jobs, discusses the Google Maps application for the iPhone during the Macworld Convention and Expo in San Francisco in 2008.
Robert Galbraith Reuters /Landov

There's been speculation for months that Apple will try to elbow Google's popular Maps app aside on the iPhone and unveil its own map app, and some of the best evidence yet comes from Tuesday's Wall Street Journal.

The paper looked into the reasons for the impending switch and the broader implications it would have for the smartphone market.

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4:07pm

Tue June 5, 2012
World

On Pakistan's 'Sesame Street,' Everything's Not A-OK

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 6:53 pm

Baily the donkey (right) and Munna, characters from the Pakistani version of Sesame Street, perform at the launch ceremony for the show, Sim Sim Hamara, at Rafi Peer Theater Workshop in Lahore, Nov. 26, 2011.
Mohsin Raza Reuters/Landov

The U.S. is withdrawing millions of dollars in funding for the Pakistani version of Sesame Street. Officials say the decision stems from serious allegations of fraud directed at the Pakistani theater company that's producing the children's TV program.

Sim Sim Hamara, the Pakistani version of Sesame Street, is set in a mock-up of a typical Pakistani town. There's a school, the ubiquitous Banyan tree, a restaurant and a colorful cast of characters centered on a 6-year-old girl named Rani who loves the sport of cricket.

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4:03pm

Tue June 5, 2012
Politics

Sky's The Limit In Campaign Cash For Wis. Governor

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 6:53 pm

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, Democratic challenger to Republican Gov. Scott Walker, greets supporters Tuesday in Racine, Wis.
Brian Kersey UPI /Landov

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker vastly out-raised and outspent his Democratic challenger in the state's recall election, largely on the strength of major donations from across the country.

One reason for that was a quirk in Wisconsin law, which lets a governor in Walker's situation bypass limits on political donations.

Wisconsin law says candidates for governor normally may not take donations of more than $10,000 each. That was the limit under which Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, the Democrat, operated in the recall election being decided Tuesday at the polls.

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3:44pm

Tue June 5, 2012
Mom And Dad's Record Collection

Mike Huckabee's Musical Education

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 6:53 pm

Mike Huckabee sits in on bass with the Tonight Show band in 2008.
Paul Drinkwater NBC via Getty Images

All Things Considered continues its "Mom and Dad's Record Collection" series with former Arkansas governor and presidential candidate Mike Huckabee. The politician currently hosts a TV show on Fox News and plays bass guitar in his rock band, Capitol Offense. His musical tastes are similarly multifaceted: Huckabee says he grew up listening to big-band jazz.

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3:32pm

Tue June 5, 2012
It's All Politics

How Accurate Is Obama's Attack On Romney's Jobs Record?

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 6:53 pm

Mitt Romney talks about his plan for creating jobs at a 2011 campaign speech in Las Vegas.
Julie Jacobson AP

A new Obama campaign ad says the Massachusetts economy actually fared poorly during Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's four years as governor, challenging the notion that Romney knows how to fix the nation's ailing economy.

The ad says that between 2003 and 2007, Massachusetts had one of the worst economic records in the country, lost 40,000 manufacturing jobs at "a rate twice the national average, and fell to 47th in job creation."

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