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All Things Considered

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On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert SiegelMichele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATCexpanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now to something kind of boring.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

We're going to talk now to a writer who has been thinking a lot this week about the Jerusalem he used to know.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

On a melancholy Saturday this past February, Shalon Irving's "village" — the friends and family she had assembled to support her as a single mother — gathered at a funeral home in a prosperous black neighborhood in southwest Atlanta to say goodbye.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

President Trump today welcomed Congress's top Democrats and Republicans to the White House. They are trying to work out a deal to keep the government open.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Here's a story of a recognition long overdue. Joe George got in his fair share of trouble during his time in the Navy. He got into a lot of fights. He described himself as a big farm boy. But that rebellious spirit saved lives on December 7, 1941.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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It's long been known that hormonal contraception, like any medicine, carries some risks. But doctors and women have hoped that the newer generations of low-dose contraceptive pills, IUDs and implants eliminated the breast cancer risk of earlier, higher-dose formulations.

Now a big study from Denmark suggests the elevated risk of getting breast cancer — while still very small for women in their teens, 20s and 30s – holds true for these low-dose methods, too.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Two women - one white, one black - are vying to be the next mayor of Atlanta. And one of them, Keisha Lance Bottoms, declared victory this morning.

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A chair is just a chair, unless it's designed as a sound-insulated "isolation sphere": a space-age, egg-shaped pod that was created by a French architect in 1971. It's the kind of unique object you can find at this year's Design Miami.

The fair features everything from vintage furniture to contemporary ceramics to handcrafted jewelry — all collectible objects from the 20th and 21st century. Rodman Primack is chief creative officer of the marketplace, where potential buyers can find unique, limited edition pieces and prototypes commissioned by 34 galleries from around the world.

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