All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-6pm, Saturdays 4-5pm, Sundays 5-6pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert SiegelMichele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATCexpanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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3:41pm

Sat May 18, 2013
Around the Nation

Impossible Choice Faces America's First 'Climate Refugees'

Originally published on Sun May 19, 2013 4:59 am

The 350 residents of Newtok, Alaska, will soon be the country's first "climate refugees." The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says the village is likely to be underwater in just four years.
Richard Sprenger The Guardian

Climate change is a stark reality in America's northernmost state. Nearly 90 percent of native Alaskan villages are on the coast, where dramatic erosion and floods have become a part of daily life.

Perched on the Ninglick River on the west coast of the state, the tiny town of Newtok may be the state's most vulnerable village. About 350 people live there, nearly all of them Yupik Eskimos. But the Ninglick is rapidly rising due to ice melt, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says the highest point in the town — a school — could be underwater by 2017.

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3:41pm

Sat May 18, 2013
Business

Internships: Low-Paid, Unpaid Or Just Plain Illegal?

Originally published on Sat May 18, 2013 6:47 pm

Students fill out applications during a job fair at the University of Illinois Springfield in February. Fed up with working for free, some interns are suing their employers.
Seth Perlman AP

Summer is almost here, and with it comes the army of interns marching into countless American workplaces. Yet what was once an opportunity for the inexperienced is becoming a front-line labor issue.

More and more, unpaid and low-paid interns are feeling their labor is being exploited. Some are even willing to push back — with lawsuits.

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3:41pm

Sat May 18, 2013
Author Interviews

'Waiting To Be Heard' No More, Amanda Knox Speaks Out

Originally published on Sat May 18, 2013 6:47 pm

Amanda Knox enters an Italian court on Oct. 3, 2011, just before being acquitted of murdering her British roommate, Meredith Kercher.
Oli Scarff AP

When 20-year-old Amanda Knox left for Italy in August 2007, it was supposed to be a carefree year studying abroad.

No one could have foreseen it ending in her being accused, tried and convicted in the murder of her roommate, Meredith Kercher.

The case, and Knox, became an international media sensation.

"I think that there was a lot of fantasy projected onto me," she tells weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden. "And that resulted in a re-appropriation and re-characterization of who I am."

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3:41pm

Sat May 18, 2013
From Our Listeners

Three-Minute Fiction Reading: 'Plum Baby'

Originally published on Sat May 18, 2013 6:47 pm

 

NPR's Susan Stamberg reads an excerpt of one of the best submissions for Round 11 of our short story contest. She reads Plum Baby by Carmiel Banasky of Portland, Ore. You can read the full story below and find other stories on our Three-Minute Fiction page or on Facebook.

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11:03am

Sat May 18, 2013
Music News

Draco Rosa: A Pop Survivor Returns From The Brink, With Friends

Originally published on Sat May 18, 2013 6:47 pm

Former bandmates Draco Rosa and Ricky Martin, seen here on stage at Univision's 2013 Premio Lo Nuestro awards celebration, reunite on Rosa's new album, Vida.
John Parra Getty Images

4:50pm

Fri May 17, 2013
Code Switch

'Venus And Serena': An Extraordinary Story, Told On Film

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 5:52 pm

Serena (right) and Venus Williams pose with their gold medals during the London 2012 Olympic Games.
Stefan Wermuth Reuters/Landov

It's Cinderella plus Jackie Robinson times two. When Venus and Serena Williams burst onto the lily-white world of tennis, they changed the game and made history: They were sisters. From a poor neighborhood. Who brought unprecedented power to the game. And both reached No. 1.

Their journey is the subject of a new documentary called Venus and Serena, showing in select theaters around the country.

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4:03pm

Fri May 17, 2013
Around the Nation

Michigan LGBT Youth Center Does Outreach With A Dance 'Hook'

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 5:52 pm

The Ruth Ellis Center helps about 5,000 young people each year.
Mercedes Mejia Michigan Radio

4:02pm

Fri May 17, 2013
Around the Nation

Boston Bombings Prompt Fresh Look At Unsolved Murders

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 5:52 pm

Gerry Leone was the district attorney for Middlesex County in Massachusetts when three people were murdered in a house in the Boston suburb of Waltham. He told reporters that police suspected the assailants and the victims knew each other.
YouTube

An unsolved triple murder in the Boston suburbs is getting a closer look in the wake of the marathon bombings. One of the victims may have been a friend of bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev. That's prompting authorities to revisit the 2011 case.

The murders took place in Waltham, Mass. On Sept. 12, 2011, police responded to a house in the leafy suburb a few miles west of Boston.

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3:56pm

Fri May 17, 2013
It's All Politics

Obama U: What Graduation Speeches Say About The President

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 5:52 pm

President Obama's commencement speeches seem to be his real State of the Union addresses. On May 5, he told Ohio State students that they were graduating into a "healing" economy.
Carolyn Kaster AP

This weekend, President Obama will give a speech that very likely won't be about the controversies of the moment.

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3:22pm

Fri May 17, 2013
Music Interviews

Bobby McFerrin: Spirituals As Sung Prayers

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 5:52 pm

Bobby McFerrin's new album is titled Spirityouall.
Carol Friedman Courtesy of the artist

Listen to Bobby McFerrin — onstage, warming up with his band — and it's like you're listening to an entire orchestra bubbling up through one man's body. He becomes a flute, a violin, a muted trumpet, a percussion instrument, a bird, you name it.

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3:20pm

Fri May 17, 2013
Commentary

Week In Politics: IRS, Benghazi Emails, AP Phone Logs

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 5:52 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And there is much to discuss with our weekly political commentators, E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post and David Brooks of the New York Times. Hey, there guys.

E.J. DIONNE: Good to be with you.

DAVID BROOKS: Hello.

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2:11pm

Fri May 17, 2013
U.S.

After Deadly Chemical Plant Disasters, There's Little Action

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 5:52 pm

The PBF Energy refinery in Paulsboro, N.J., uses toxic chemicals such as hydrofluoric acid. Rather than using "inherently safer" design methods, the industry says, other safety measures are taken to prevent accidents like the one in West, Texas.
Mel Evans AP

You might think that everything would have changed for the chemicals industry on April 16, 1947. That was the day of the Texas City Disaster, the worst industrial accident in U.S. history. A ship loaded with ammonium nitrate — the same chemical that appears to have caused the disaster last month in West, Texas — exploded. The ship sparked a chain reaction of blasts at chemical facilities onshore, creating what a newsreel at the time called "a holocaust that baffles description."

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4:45pm

Thu May 16, 2013
It's All Politics

Some Lawmakers Want Big-Budget Groups Included In IRS Debate

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 6:24 pm

4:45pm

Thu May 16, 2013
Shots - Health News

Why Is Psychiatry's New Manual So Much Like The Old One?

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 11:51 am

Despite significant advances in neurology and imaging, researchers still don't have simple lab tests for diagnosing patients with mental disorders. Diagnoses are still mostly based on a patient's signs and symptoms.
BSIP UIG via Getty Images

The American Psychiatric Association is about to release an updated version of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The DSM helps mental health professionals decide who has problems such as depression, anxiety and schizophrenia.

Psychiatry's new manual, DSM-5, has been nearly 20 years in the making. During that time, scientists have learned a lot about the brain. Yet despite some tweaks to categories such as autism and mood disorders, DSM-5 is remarkably similar to the version issued in 1994.

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4:09pm

Thu May 16, 2013
Music Interviews

Daft Punk On 'The Soul That A Musician Can Bring'

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 11:00 am

In spite of the robotic persona they've cultivated for years, Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo elected to make the latest Daft Punk album in a real studio, with real musicians.
David Black Courtesy of the artist

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