All Things Considered

Weekdays 3-6pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert SiegelMichele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATCexpanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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4:29pm

Tue August 19, 2014
News

Amid The Chaos In Ferguson, Another Police Shooting

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:38 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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4:29pm

Tue August 19, 2014
Middle East

Blocked At The Border, Gaza Man's Hopes Of Escape Fade

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:38 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:28pm

Tue August 19, 2014
Goats and Soda

Doctors Without Borders: What We Need To Contain Ebola

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 7:51 pm

Dr. Joanne Liu (left), international president of Doctors Without Borders poses with a member of the MSF medical team at the organization's Ebola treatment center in Kailahun, Sierra Leone.
P.K. Lee Courtesy of Doctors Without Border

With the continuous uptick in the number of cases and deaths in the current Ebola outbreak, the few agencies that are on ground are stretched thin.

That includes Doctors Without Borders, also known as MSF. It's one of the main health care providers in West Africa, where there are more than 2,000 cases of Ebola and 1,200 deaths. Even with roughly 1,000 volunteers spread among the three Ebola-stricken countries, the agency says that still isn't enough.

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4:14pm

Tue August 19, 2014
Goats and Soda

Ebola In The Skies? How The Virus Made It To West Africa

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 7:37 pm

Leif Parsons for NPR

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the most explosive in history. One reason the virus spread so fast is that West Africa was blindsided. Ebola had never erupted in people anywhere close to West Africa before.

The type of Ebola causing the outbreak — called Zaire — is the deadliest strain. Until this year, it had been seen only in Central Africa, about 2,500 miles away. That's about the distance between Boston and San Francisco.

So how did it spread across this giant swath of land without anybody noticing?

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4:01pm

Tue August 19, 2014
This Week's Must Read

'This Fight Begins In The Heart': Reading James Baldwin As Ferguson Seethes

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 4:55 pm

It is early August. A black man is shot by a white policeman. And the effect on the community is of "a lit match in a tin of gasoline."

No, this is not Ferguson, Mo. This was Harlem in August 1943, a period that James Baldwin writes about in the essay that gives its title to his seminal collection, Notes of a Native Son.

The story begins with the death of Baldwin's father, a proud, severe preacher who viewed all white people with suspicion, even the kindly schoolteacher who encouraged his son's writings.

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4:00pm

Tue August 19, 2014
The Two-Way

Ferguson Teachers Use Day Off As Opportunity For A Civics Lesson

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 7:30 pm

Teachers with the Jennings School District pick up trash Tuesday on West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Mo., the scene of nightly police clashes. Jennings and the neighboring Ferguson school district have canceled class due to ongoing unrest.
Elise Hu NPR

Chaos and unrest overnight have kept the National Guard in the suburban town of Ferguson, Mo., for a second day, and the local school district has canceled classes for the week. After two nights of violent clashes this week, neighboring Jennings School District is out of class, too.

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3:05pm

Tue August 19, 2014
Latin America

Once An Object Of Reverence, Brazilian Soccer's A Punchline

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:38 pm

It's been over a month since the World Cup ended in Brazil, but the shame of the country's blowout loss remains. Once, Brazilians were welcomed in other countries with talk of Brazil's soccer dominance; now, everyone merely speaks of their historic defeat against Germany.

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3:05pm

Tue August 19, 2014
Digital Life

We Are What We Google: How Search Terms Reflect Our Wealth

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:38 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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3:05pm

Tue August 19, 2014
Race

Study Shows Sharp Racial Divide In Reaction To Ferguson

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 9:06 pm

A recent study by the Pew Research Center finds that there are stark racial divisions in reactions to the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Audie Cornish talks to Carroll Doherty, director of political research at Pew, for more.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:56pm

Mon August 18, 2014
All Tech Considered

How Long Do CDs Last? It Depends, But Definitely Not Forever

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 7:27 am

Many institutions have their archives stored on CDs — but the discs aren't as stable as once thought. There is no average life span for a CD, says preservationist Michele Youket, "because there is no average disc."
Sarah Tilotta NPR

Back in the 1990s, historical societies, museums and symphonies across the country began transferring all kinds of information onto what was thought to be a very durable medium: the compact disc.

Now, preservationists are worried that a lot of key information stored on CDs — from sound recordings to public records — is going to disappear. Some of those little silver discs are degrading, and researchers at the Library of Congress are trying to figure out why.

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4:15pm

Mon August 18, 2014
Environment

One Year After Calif. Rim Fire, Debate Simmers Over Forest Recovery

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 6:40 pm

Maria Benech of the U.S. Forest Service surveys a severely burned patch of forest. Almost 40 percent of the burned area looks similar.
Lauren Sommer KQED

Eric Knapp breaks apart a burned pine cone, looking for seeds — in his line of work this is considered a clue.

"Going into an area after a fire, you almost feel like CSI, you know, sleuthing," Knapp says.

He is standing in a part of the Stanislaus National Forest that was severely burned by the Rim Fire. Knapp, an ecologist with the U.S. Forest Service, is studying how forests recover.

"It's completely dead," he says. "These trees won't be coming back to life."

A lot of the forest was charred like this.

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4:14pm

Mon August 18, 2014
Deceptive Cadence

Met Opera Tentatively Settles With 2 Major Unions

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 5:32 pm

The Metropolitan Opera has settled labor contracts with two of its largest unions.
Jonathan Ticler Metropolitan Opera

A labor crisis threatening to shut down New York's Metropolitan Opera — the largest opera house in the world — appears to have been averted. Two of the major unions announced a tentative settlement this morning. While agreements with 10 additional unions need to be reached by Tuesday night, this represents a major turning point in a bitter dispute.

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4:14pm

Mon August 18, 2014
Parallels

Embattled Yazidis Say They Are Now Enduring Atrocity No. 74

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 9:55 pm

Abbas Soullo, a Yazidi man, shows his bullet wounds at a camp for the displaced in northern Iraq, near the Syrian border. He says he is the only survivor of 58 Yazidi men who were rounded up and shot on Aug. 3 in the town of Jazira.
Peter Kenyon NPR

A massacre of members of the Yazidi minority in the Iraqi town of Kocho made headlines last week. Around 80 men were killed by militants from the so-called Islamic State, the extremist group that has swept through much of northern Iraq.

But that was not the only massacre, according to the Yazidis. In a camp for the displaced near the Syrian border, people call 21-year-old Abbas Khader Soullo a walking miracle. To explain why, he unbuttons his shirt and shows his bullet wounds.

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3:16pm

Mon August 18, 2014
Music Reviews

Album Review: 'The Voyager'

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 5:18 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:16pm

Mon August 18, 2014
Men In America

The Soldier's Guiding Paradox: 'Protect What You Love'

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 5:43 pm

Writer Elliot Ackerman, former Marine officer and veteran of five deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan, explains what being a man means to him: It's protecting what you love. Unfortunately, that notion is often at odds with the job of a soldier.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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