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5:20pm

Sat May 31, 2014
Movie Interviews

What Is Courage?: 'Korengal' Breaks Down War In Afghanistan

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 5:42 pm

Sgt. 1st Class Mark Patterson checks his men at Outpost Restrepo in Afghanistan, as documented in the new film Korengal.
Outpost Films

In the new documentary Korengal, journalist and director Sebastian Junger again takes viewers into Afghanistan's Korengal Valley — once considered one of the military's most dangerous postings.

The film uses footage shot by Junger and the late photojournalist Tim Hetherington. Between 2007 and 2008, Junger and Hetherington spent 10 months with a platoon of about 30 men at an outpost called Restrepo.

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2:07pm

Fri May 30, 2014
Technology

Techies, White House Take Part In National Day Of Civic Hacking

Sameer Verma

This weekend, software developers, entrepreneurs, and local governments from around the world are coming together to design and build tools for the common good.

Using publicly released data, participants in the National Day of Civic Hacking will work together to integrate new technology tools to solve community problems.

Todd Khozein is one of the organizers of #HackForChange. He is the co-founder of SecondMuse, a collaborative innovation lab that helps find technological solutions to everyday issues.

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2:04am

Fri May 30, 2014
StoryCorps

Once Forbidden, Books Become A Lifeline For A Young Migrant Worker

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 12:33 pm

On a visit to StoryCorps, Storm Reyes told her son, Jeremy Hagquist, about growing up as a farm laborer. Reyes eventually went to night school and worked in a library for more than 30 years.
StoryCorps

In the late 1950s, when she was just 8 years old, Storm Reyes began picking fruit as a full-time farm laborer for less than $1 per hour. Storm and her family moved often, living in Native American migrant worker camps without electricity or running water.

With all that moving around, she wasn't allowed to have books growing up, Storm tells her son, Jeremy Hagquist, on a visit to StoryCorps in Tacoma, Wash.

"Books are heavy, and when you're moving a lot you have to keep things just as minimal as possible," she says.

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4:25pm

Wed May 28, 2014
Blue Note At 75

Cause For Celebration: The Iconic Blue Note Records At 75

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 10:48 pm

Drummer Art Blakey, who recorded for Blue Note from 1954 to 1965, in the studio.
Francis Wolff Blue Note Records

Blue Note Records is the kind of record label that people like to call "storied" — so celebrated and impactful that no one narrative can capture its essence. From swing to bebop and hard bop, through fusion and the avant-garde, Blue Note has been telling the story of jazz in the grooves of its records since 1939 — and for its 75th anniversary, it's releasing remastered vinyl editions of some gems from its catalog. But the real legacy of the label is too big to capture on disc.

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2:30am

Wed May 28, 2014
The Salt

Want Your Cheese To Age Gracefully? Cowgirl Creamery's Got Tips

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 10:27 am

Sue Conley (left) and Peggy Smith, co-founders of Cowgirl Creamery, prepare their chilled leek and asparagus soup with creme fraiche and fresh ricotta at Cowgirl Creamery in Point Reyes Station, Calif.
Tim Hussin for NPR

In the world of cheese, much like in the world of wine, the ultimate mark of success is acceptance by the French. That's exactly what happened to Sue Conley and Peggy Smith, co-founders of Cowgirl Creamery in northern California.

In 2010, when they were inducted into the prestigious Guilde des Fromagers, they were among the first wave of American cheesemakers to join its ranks.

Cowgirl Creamery also put out its first cookbook in late 2013.

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6:11pm

Tue May 27, 2014
Digital Life

A Killer's Manifesto Reveals Wide Reach Of Misogyny Online

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 7:10 am

The misogynistic manifesto written by Elliot Rodger, the 22-year-old who police say killed six people before taking his own life Friday, quickly led to an outpouring on Twitter under the hashtag #YesAllWomen. Women and men alike used the hashtag to share stories and statistics about harassment and sexual assault.

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5:57pm

Sun May 25, 2014
All Tech Considered

Going Dark: The Internet Behind The Internet

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 2:17 pm

The Deep Web is a part of the Internet not accessible by standard Web browsers and search engines.
iStockphoto.com

The average computer user with an Internet connection has access to an amazing wealth of information. But there's also an entire world that's invisible to your standard Web browser.

These parts of the Internet are known as the Deep Web. The tools to get to there are just a few clicks away, and more and more people who want to browse the Web anonymously are signing on.

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4:18pm

Thu May 22, 2014
Photography And Memory

Overexposed? Camera Phones Could Be Washing Out Our Memories

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 11:58 am

Rebecca Woolf takes a lot of photos of her children for her blog, Girl's Gone Child, but says she tries to not let the camera get in the middle of a moment.
Courtesy of Rebecca Woolf

Los Angeles blogger Rebecca Woolf uses her blog, Girl's Gone Child, as a window into her family's life. Naturally, it includes oodles of pictures of her four children.

She says she's probably taken tens of thousands of photos since her oldest child was born. And she remembers the moment when it suddenly clicked — if you will — that she was too absorbed in digital documentation.

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3:54pm

Thu May 22, 2014
Found Recipes

Freed From The Sidewalk Cart, This Sauerkraut Goes Global

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 7:21 pm

Don't diss the sauerkraut: It may be a hot dog staple, but it's more versatile than you think.
Courtesy of Edward Lee

Edward Lee thought he knew sauerkraut. The chef for the Louisville, Ky., restaurant 610 Magnolia, grew up in New York City, a place where sauerkraut means one thing: "sidewalk hot dog carts — cheap, bad, overboiled sauerkraut on top of awful kosher hot dogs," he says.

He loved it, as any native New Yorker might, but it was sauerkraut -- boring, safe, standard.

Many years later, after Lee moved to Kentucky, he had a sauerkraut surprise at his then-fiance's house. When she broke out a jar of her mother's homemade sauerkraut, he didn't expect too much.

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4:07pm

Wed May 21, 2014
Politics

40 Years After Watergate, A Look Back At Nixon's Downfall

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 12:43 pm

Washington Journal

Forty years ago, in mid-May 1974, Elizabeth Drew, the Washington correspondent for The New Yorker, wrote this in her journal: "Rumors went around the Capitol today that the President was resigning."

The Capitol, she observed was "noisy and edgy .. and in the hothouse atmosphere, the rumors burst into full bloom."

By August 1974 the president in question, Richard Nixon, would resign rather than face a Senate impeachment trial.

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2:20am

Wed May 21, 2014
Environment

For N.J. Mayor, The Time To Adapt To Rising Sea Levels Is Now

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 11:41 am

Hoboken, N.J., residents walk through flood water in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. Mayor Dawn Zimmer is advocating for better planning and increased funding for flood-prone urban areas.
Charles Sykes AP

Last week, scientists warned that a massive chunk of the West Antarctica Ice Sheet will eventually drift into the sea and melt, raising sea levels at least 10 feet higher than previous predictions.

Even before the announcement, scientists at the nonprofit research organization Climate Central predicted that surging seas could put the homes of nearly 5 million Americans underwater by the end of this century.

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4:09pm

Tue May 20, 2014
Music

Heir To A Jazz Legacy, A Trumpeter Finds His Own Way

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 9:20 am

Theo Croker's new album, AfroPhysicist, comes out May 20.
Thomas Brodin Courtesy of the artist

Jazz composer and trumpeter Theo Croker opens his new album, AfroPhysicist, with an ode to his grandfather: New Orleans jazz great Doc Cheatham. The thing is, Croker didn't grow up in New Orleans or any other jazz hub. He's from Jacksonville, Fla., and he was just a child when his grandfather died in 1997. It wasn't until his grandfather's memorial services — attended by jazz legends — that he decided to join the legacy.

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4:07pm

Sat May 17, 2014
Shots - Health News

Filtering A New Idea: A Book That's Educational And 'Drinkable'

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 9:32 pm

Contaminated water can spread diseases like cholera and typhoid. A new project aims to provide water filters in the form of an educational book.
Soe Than Win AFP/Getty Images

2:35am

Fri May 16, 2014
Politics

Amid Complaints, Lawmakers Seek More Oversight For Border Agents

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 11:07 am

United States border patrol agents monitor a fence in Hidalgo, Texas. Two congressmen, from Texas and New Mexico, are seeking a review of some agency policies.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

U.S. Reps. Beto O'Rourke of Texas and Steve Pearce of New Mexico are looking for answers to their questions about the Border Patrol. These Southwest representatives, one Democrat and the other Republican, have neighboring districts along the U.S.-Mexico border.

They introduced legislation in March that calls for more oversight and accountability for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, or CBP.

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11:37am

Thu May 15, 2014
Wisdom Watch

Oldest National Park Ranger Shares 'What Gets Remembered'

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 1:26 pm

Betty Reid Soskin, 92, is the oldest active full-time National Park Service ranger in the United States. She and her colleagues at the Rosie the Riveter World War II Home Front National Historical Park are preparing to unveil new permanent exhibits at the park on May 24.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

As 92-year-old Betty Reid Soskin helped hash out plans for a new national park 13 years ago, this is what stuck in her mind: "What gets remembered is a function of who's in the room doing the remembering."

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