2:00pm

Wed March 21, 2012
Middle East

UN Security Council Approves Annan's Syria Plan

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Former U.N. Security General Kofi Annan got a boost today from the Security Council as he struggles to resolve the crisis in Syria. The council endorsed his peace proposals. They call for a daily two-hour pause in fighting to allow humanitarian aid in and for a political dialogue between the Syrian government and the opposition. Here's NPR's Michele Kelemen.

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2:00pm

Wed March 21, 2012
Europe

Shooting Suspect Remains Cornered In Toulouse

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. The French newspaper Le Monde is calling it the interminable siege. Since early this morning, French police have been in a standoff with a man suspected of murdering seven people in the southern city of Toulouse, seven people in three different shootings. They were all killed in broad daylight and at point blank range. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley is following the ongoing drama from Paris.

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1:54pm

Wed March 21, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

How Obama Lost The Messaging War Over Health Care Law

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 7:44 pm

Protesters show their opposition to President Obama's health care overhaul on March 16, 2010, days before it became law.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

The sweeping health overhaul law turns 2 years old this Friday. And as it heads toward a constitutional showdown at the Supreme Court next week, the debate over the measure remains almost as heated as the day President Obama signed it into law.

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1:38pm

Wed March 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Sifting Through What We Know About The French Shootings Suspect

Police officers stand near the apartment building where a suspect in the shooting at the Ozar Hatorah Jewish school is barricaded in Toulouse, southern France on Wednesday.
Bob Edme AP

The standoff between a murder suspect and French police in Toulouse, France, has stirred up a swirl of speculation about the man's background and motives, but so far there are relatively few confirmed facts.

French officials say the suspect is a 23- or 24-year-old Frenchman of Algerian decent by the name of Mohammed Merah, who had a long record as a juvenile delinquent.

He's suspected in the killings this month of three French paratroopers of North African descent, as well as a rabbi and three Jewish schoolchildren.

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12:45pm

Wed March 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Gingrich: Some 'Brand New Players' Might Emerge At GOP Convention

Originally published on Fri March 23, 2012 6:03 am

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Saying that Mitt Romney may not be able to "grind his way toward the nomination" despite a huge fundraising advantage, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich told NPR today that he sees no reason to exit the Republican presidential race and that there's a chance of a new contender emerging at the party's convention in August.

"I'm not so sure you wouldn't get a series of brand new players" stepping forward during a brokered convention, he told Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep.

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12:19pm

Wed March 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Jets, Broncos Complete Trade For Tim Tebow

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 9:47 pm

Tebow celebrates after the game against the New York Jets on Nov. 17, 2011 in Denver.
Garrett Ellwood Getty Images

The Denver Broncos have traded quarterback Tim Tebow to the New York Jets in exchange for a fourth-round and a sixth-round draft pick, Newsday is reporting.

Tebow became redundant in Denver after the team signed Peyton Manning to a five-year, $96 million contract. Newsday adds:

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12:12pm

Wed March 21, 2012
U.S.

Florida Teen's Killing: A Parent's Greatest Fear

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 4:21 pm

Brandon Northington (right) a FAMU law student chants, "Do I look suspicious?" while holding a bag of Skittles during a rally Monday at the Seminole County Courthouse in Sanford, Fla. Trayvon Martin was holding the candy when he was shot and killed.
Red Huber MCT /Landov

The fatal shooting in Florida of an unarmed black teenager at the hand of a neighborhood watch captain has ignited national furor over racial profiling and vigilante justice.

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12:05pm

Wed March 21, 2012
The Two-Way

NFL Slams Saints Over Bountygate; Coach Suspended For 2012 Season

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 1:03 pm

New Orleans Saints head coach Sean Payton, left, and then-defensive coordinator Gregg Williams in August 2010.
Chris Graythen Getty Images

New Orleans Saints head coach Sean Payton has been "suspended for one season without pay for his involvement in the team's bounty program," NFL.com reports.

The team's former defensive coordinator, Gregg Williams, "has been suspended indefinitely." He ran the program that paid players bounties for hits that knocked opponents out of games. Williams left the Saints after last season to join the St. Louis Rams.

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11:57am

Wed March 21, 2012
The Two-Way

'Invisible Children' Co-Founder Suffered 'Brief Reactive Psychosis'

The co-founder of Invisible Children, who was detained by police in San Diego last week after residents complained he was naked on a residential street, was not on drugs, his wife said.

Jason Russell, who was catapulted into the national spotlight after his video on Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony went viral, has been shown in videos naked and apparently talking to himself on the streets of San Diego.

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11:34am

Wed March 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Reports: Obama Will Call For Southern Portion Of XL Pipeline To Be Expedited

Quoting "a White House official," CNN and USA Today are reporting that in a speech tomorrow President Obama will push for fast-tracking the construction of the southern portion of the Keystone XL pipeline.

USA Today reports:

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11:09am

Wed March 21, 2012
Monkey See

Tebow, Tailgating, And Team Loyalty: Why The NFL Needs Nice Guys More Than Ever

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 12:08 pm

Tim Tebow of the Denver Broncos kneels and prays with teammates and members of the New England Patriots after the Patriots won 45-10 during their AFC Divisional Playoff Game at Gillette Stadium on January 14, 2012.
Al Bello Getty Images

10:59am

Wed March 21, 2012
The Salt

Intense Aromas Lead To Smaller Bites

The stronger the aroma, the more likely you are to take a smaller bite, researchers found.
iStockphoto.com

We've known for a while that a food's aroma has a big influence on our perception of how it tastes. Now it looks like smell also can affect how much we eat.

People who ate vanilla custard in a laboratory ate smaller bites when they smelled a stronger cream aroma, according to a new study. The stronger the smell, the smaller the bite.

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10:58am

Wed March 21, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

High Altitude Got You Down? Try Ibuprofen

Originally published on Fri March 23, 2012 8:17 am

If hiking in the High Sierra gives you a headache, ibuprofen could help.
Miguel Vieira Flickr

If you're the type who likes to hike, ski or climb mountains, you might want to pack a bottle of ibuprofen — not just for achy muscle aches, but to help prevent altitude sickness.

Tens of millions of people travel to high-altitude spots each year, and a quarter of them wind up with acute altitude sickness from ascending too fast. The headaches, dizziness, sleeplessness, nausea, vomiting and other symptoms can ruin a vacation. In severe cases, it can cause fatal swelling in the brain.

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9:50am

Wed March 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Jeb Bush Endorses Romney

Then-governors Mitt Romney (left) of Massachusetts and Jeb Bush of Florida in 2005. Bush has endorsed his fellow Republican's presidential bid.
Steven Senne AP

One day after Mitt Romney's win in Illinois and the talk that has again raised about the former Massachusetts governor being the "inevitable" Republican presidential nominee, he's picked up the coveted endorsement of former Florida governor Jeb Bush.

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9:48am

Wed March 21, 2012
National Security

Accused Sergeant Heads Down A Long Legal Road

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 10:50 am

Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, who is accused of killing 16 Afghan civilians, will have the case heard in the military justice system, which has significant differences from the civilian courts. Here, Bales is shown in a training exercise in Fort Irwin, Calif., last August.
Spc. Ryan Hallock AP

The military justice system has been crafted to work efficiently, but Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales can expect a lengthy legal process as he faces accusations that he killed 16 men, women and children in Afghanistan

Bales is locked up in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, as he and his lawyer prepare for a case that involves a horrendous mass murder. In addition, it's a stress point that could trigger retaliation against American troops and even affect the course of a U.S. war that's more than a decade old.

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